ISOC Member Newsletter - February 2011

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

ITU decision Q&A

What is MPLS?

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a networking standard, created by the IETF, that assigns labels to data packets, which can then operate across multiple different protocols. Forwarding or switching decisions for MPLS packets from one network node to another are made on the basis of the label (i.e., without requiring equipment to examine the packet’s content) facilitating easy to create end-to-end circuits. MPLS is commonly used to create Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and it can be used to deliver different levels of quality of service (QoS) for different types of data. It is also gives service providers flexibility in routing; for example, to avoid broken links or failures.

What is the IETF’s role with respect to MPLS?

The IETF defined the MPLS specification, as part of the overall Internet technology specifications, which include the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6).

What is OAM?

OAM stands for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance; it is essentially the set of tools that assist an operator in managing and troubleshooting a network. This includes everything from ping and traceroute to SNMP, NetConf, and a variety of other management tools.

What has happened recently?

At a meeting that ran late into the evening on Friday 25th February 2011 in Geneva, one of the ITU’s technology focused study groups, the ITU-T Study Group 15, determined a Recommendation that defines operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. The determined Recommendation is at odds with an IETF standard, in spite of an agreement put in place by the ITU and the IETF two years ago to avoid such an outcome.

 

Why does this action matter?

By deciding to initiate its own non-interoperable MPLS technology development, the ITU has created a situation where, in the future there will be two groups of MPLS products that will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet.

Haven’t these international organizations worked together to develop MPLS standards and technologies?

Yes. Over the last few years, the ITU and the IETF have successfully collaborated on work in this field. Several years ago, both organizations created a joint working team (JWT) to examine the feasibility of developing a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements.

The JWT provided a report that stated not only that a single solution was possible but also confirmed that it was possible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet additional requirements.  The JWT report went on to recommend that protocol development for this enhanced MPLS, to be known as MPLS-TP, should be undertaken by the IETF. Both organisations subsequently endorsed these findings and formally accepted the JWT report in December 2008.

Regarding the MPLS OAM, the agreement based on the JWT report also stated that both organizations are able to work in this field; but with the fundamental agreement that each would deliver mutually compatible technologies.

What is likely to happen with two non-interoperable standards are developed?

If both technologies are deployed, it is likely that there will be confusion; if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Is there a commercial reason for the ITU to create a separate standard? Was the organization responding to customer demand?

The organization is driven to respond to its membership’s demands, expressed through contributions.  Certain members chose to develop this competing technology in the ITU, developing a second solution, instead of just one as recommended by the Joint Working Team (JWT).

What role does the IETF play in Internet standards development?

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the world’s premier Internet standards developer. Its mission is to make the Internet work better by producing high quality, relevant technical documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet.

Why are global standards so important?

The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. The availability of open standards means that anyone, anywhere in the world can design products, applications and technologies that enhance the Internet’s functionality.

What about multi-stakeholder collaboration in standards development?

The Internet Society believes that any interested parties, individuals or organizations should be able to contribute to standards development. In fact the IETF ensures that any interested person can participate in its work, know what is being decided, and make his or her voice heard on the issue. We believe that this collaborative approach leads to the development of an Internet that delivers the maximum value.

Did the IETF participate in the ITU-T SG15? Who made the decision?

The Internet Society is the organizational home for the IETF, and the IETF participates through the Internet Society’s ITU-T sector membership.  In that role, the IETF/Internet Society spoke against this action.  Ultimately, the decision was made by a vote. Only ITU member states (not Sector Members) were allowed to vote.

How has this sort of disconnect between the IETF and ITU been handled in the past?

This action is without precedent.

What will the IETF do?

The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification. In the ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF continues to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

Is the IETF moving too slowly on MPLS development?

The IETF has been working on the MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP), and has been making steady and consistent progress. The JWT Report was agreed in December 2008, and the first document was published as an RFC in June 2009. This progress is actually quite rapid for any standards process.

Furthermore, there is a huge amount of work being undertaken in the relevant IETF working group: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/mpls/

Why was the Interoperability Design Team disbanded?

A design team is always a short-term mechanism and once it reports back to the WG, it closes down. The MPLS-TP Interoperability Design Team was disbanded because it had finished its work, which was shifted to the MPLS Working Group to take the process further.  This is a normal practice in the IETF.  Progressing work on the MPLS standard has involved creating many other Design Teams and they have been shut down when their work was complete. It does not mean that work was in any way suspended.

Here is the official IETF description of a Design Team: from BCP 25 (RFC 2418):

6.5. Design teams

It is often useful, and perhaps inevitable, for a sub-group of a working group to develop a proposal to solve a particular problem. Such a sub-group is called a design team.  In order for a design team to remain small and agile, it is acceptable to have closed membership

and private meetings.  Design teams may range from an informal chat between people in a hallway to a formal set of expert volunteers that the WG chair or AD appoints to attack a controversial problem.  The output of a design team is always subject to approval, rejection or modification by the WG as a whole.”

In other words, what counts in the IETF process is the Working Group consensus, not the design team consensus. There are cases where the WG refuses or significantly changes the design team proposal; RFC 3246 and RFC 3248 are good examples.

What interoperability problems are we likely to see with two separate management protocols for MPLS implemented?

If there are two MPLS-TP protocols implemented, the passage of the data packets themselves around the network will remain unaffected. However, problems will arise if something goes wrong. In that case, if the MPLS routers use a different management protocol than the management systems, then the notification of the problem won’t be registered. There will also be serious problems for businesses if two systems are used – for example following a merger. These businesses will find that one management system can manage one set of routers, and the other management system the other routers, but problems on the boundary between the two systems won’t be handled properly.

""

Chapter Update: Hong Kong

Contributed by: Charles Mok

From 15th to the 25th February, the best and brightest of the Internet world gathered in Hong Kong, for what turned out to be the largest Internet community gathering in the Asia Pacific region: “APRICOT-APAN 2011” which was hosted by Internet Society Hong Kong Chapter and DotAsia Organization.

APRICOT (Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies) is the annual conference of the Asia Pacific Internet Association (APIA), and has since 1996 become the biggest event for Internet service providers, public network builders and technologists, while APAN (Asia Pacific Advanced Network) is made up of national laboratories and universities researchers.

This is the first time APRICOT-APAN was held concurrently, the event was successful beyond our expectations – with over 1,500 participants from more than 60 countries around the world, including, not only Asia Pacific but Europe, the Americas and Africa.

We were fortunate  to have Dr Vint Cerf, one of the Fathers of the Internet and Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, and Dr Ya-Qin Zhang, Microsoft Corporate Vice President and Head of Microsoft’s Asia Pacific Research Lab, to be our opening keynote speakers, and Dr H. David Lambert, CEO of Internet2, was our closing keynote speaker.

""

IETF and Internet Society Statement relating to today’s ITU-T SG15 decision that will lead to non-interoperability in MPLS development

Today, the ITU-T Study Group 15 determined a Recommendation that defines Y.1731 based operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. This decision sets the stage for a divergence in MPLS development; it creates a situation where some vendors will use the IETF standard for MPLS OAM while other vendors implement the ITU-T Recommendation for OAM. This situation ensures that the two product groups will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet, which is an interoperable network of networks.

ITU decision Q&A

What is MPLS?

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a networking standard, created by the IETF, that assigns labels to data packets, which can then operate across multiple different protocols. Forwarding or switching decisions for MPLS packets from one network node to another are made on the basis of the label (i.e., without requiring equipment to examine the packet’s content) facilitating easy to create end-to-end circuits. MPLS is commonly used to create Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and it can be used to deliver different levels of quality of service (QoS) for different types of data. It is also gives service providers flexibility in routing; for example, to avoid broken links or failures.

What is the IETF’s role with respect to MPLS?

The IETF defined the MPLS specification, as part of the overall Internet technology specifications, which include the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6).

What is OAM?

OAM stands for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance; it is essentially the set of tools that assist an operator in managing and troubleshooting a network. This includes everything from ping and traceroute to SNMP, NetConf, and a variety of other management tools.

What has happened recently?

At a meeting that ran late into the evening on Friday 25th February 2011 in Geneva, one of the ITU’s technology focused study groups, the ITU-T Study Group 15, determined a Recommendation that defines operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. The determined Recommendation is at odds with an IETF standard, in spite of an agreement put in place by the ITU and the IETF two years ago to avoid such an outcome.

Why does this action matter?

By deciding to initiate its own non-interoperable MPLS technology development, the ITU has created a situation where, in the future there will be two groups of MPLS products that will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet.

Haven’t these international organizations worked together to develop MPLS standards and technologies?

Yes. Over the last few years, the ITU and the IETF have successfully collaborated on work in this field. Several years ago, both organizations created a joint working team (JWT) to examine the feasibility of developing a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements.

The JWT provided a report that stated not only that a single solution was possible but also confirmed that it was possible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet additional requirements.  The JWT report went on to recommend that protocol development for this enhanced MPLS, to be known as MPLS-TP, should be undertaken by the IETF. Both organisations subsequently endorsed these findings and formally accepted the JWT report in December 2008.

Regarding the MPLS OAM, the agreement based on the JWT report also stated that both organizations are able to work in this field; but with the fundamental agreement that each would deliver mutually compatible technologies.

What is likely to happen with two non-interoperable standards are developed?

If both technologies are deployed, it is likely that there will be confusion; if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Is there a commercial reason for the ITU to create a separate standard? Was the organization responding to customer demand?

The organization is driven to respond to its membership’s demands, expressed through contributions.  Certain members chose to develop this competing technology in the ITU, developing a second solution, instead of just one as recommended by the Joint Working Team (JWT).

What role does the IETF play in Internet standards development?

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the world’s premier Internet standards developer. Its mission is to make the Internet work better by producing high quality, relevant technical documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet.

Why are global standards so important?

The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. The availability of open standards means that anyone, anywhere in the world can design products, applications and technologies that enhance the Internet’s functionality.

What about multi-stakeholder collaboration in standards development?

The Internet Society believes that any interested parties, individuals or organizations should be able to contribute to standards development. In fact the IETF ensures that any interested person can participate in its work, know what is being decided, and make his or her voice heard on the issue. We believe that this collaborative approach leads to the development of an Internet that delivers the maximum value.

Did the IETF participate in the ITU-T SG15? Who made the decision?

The Internet Society is the organizational home for the IETF, and the IETF participates through the Internet Society’s ITU-T sector membership.  In that role, the IETF/Internet Society spoke against this action.  Ultimately, the decision was made by a vote. Only ITU member states (not Sector Members) were allowed to vote.

How has this sort of disconnect between the IETF and ITU been handled in the past?

This action is without precedent.

What will the IETF do?

The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification. In the ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF continues to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

Is the IETF moving too slowly on MPLS development?

The IETF has been working on the MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP), and has been making steady and consistent progress. The JWT Report was agreed in December 2008, and the first document was published as an RFC in June 2009. This progress is actually quite rapid for any standards process.

Furthermore, there is a huge amount of work being undertaken in the relevant IETF working group: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/mpls/

Why was the Interoperability Design Team disbanded?

A design team is always a short-term mechanism and once it reports back to the WG, it closes down. The MPLS-TP Interoperability Design Team was disbanded because it had finished its work, which was shifted to the MPLS Working Group to take the process further.  This is a normal practice in the IETF.  Progressing work on the MPLS standard has involved creating many other Design Teams and they have been shut down when their work was complete. It does not mean that work was in any way suspended.

Here is the official IETF description of a Design Team: from BCP 25 (RFC 2418):

6.5. Design teams

It is often useful, and perhaps inevitable, for a sub-group of a working group to develop a proposal to solve a particular problem. Such a sub-group is called a design team.  In order for a design team to remain small and agile, it is acceptable to have closed membership

and private meetings.  Design teams may range from an informal chat between people in a hallway to a formal set of expert volunteers that the WG chair or AD appoints to attack a controversial problem.  The output of a design team is always subject to approval, rejection or modification by the WG as a whole.”

In other words, what counts in the IETF process is the Working Group consensus, not the design team consensus. There are cases where the WG refuses or significantly changes the design team proposal; RFC 3246 and RFC 3248 are good examples.

What interoperability problems are we likely to see with two separate management protocols for MPLS implemented?

If there are two MPLS-TP protocols implemented, the passage of the data packets themselves around the network will remain unaffected. However, problems will arise if something goes wrong. In that case, if the MPLS routers use a different management protocol than the management systems, then the notification of the problem won’t be registered. There will also be serious problems for businesses if two systems are used – for example following a merger. These businesses will find that one management system can manage one set of routers, and the other management system the other routers, but problems on the boundary between the two systems won’t be handled properly.

""

Chapter Update: Hong Kong

Contributed by: Charles Mok

From 15th to the 25th February, the best and brightest of the Internet world gathered in Hong Kong, for what turned out to be the largest Internet community gathering in the Asia Pacific region: “APRICOT-APAN 2011” which was hosted by Internet Society Hong Kong Chapter and DotAsia Organization.

APRICOT (Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies) is the annual conference of the Asia Pacific Internet Association (APIA), and has since 1996 become the biggest event for Internet service providers, public network builders and technologists, while APAN (Asia Pacific Advanced Network) is made up of national laboratories and universities researchers.

This is the first time APRICOT-APAN was held concurrently, the event was successful beyond our expectations – with over 1,500 participants from more than 60 countries around the world, including, not only Asia Pacific but Europe, the Americas and Africa.

We were fortunate  to have Dr Vint Cerf, one of the Fathers of the Internet and Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, and Dr Ya-Qin Zhang, Microsoft Corporate Vice President and Head of Microsoft’s Asia Pacific Research Lab, to be our opening keynote speakers, and Dr H. David Lambert, CEO of Internet2, was our closing keynote speaker.

""

IETF and Internet Society Statement relating to today’s ITU-T SG15 decision that will lead to non-interoperability in MPLS development

Today, the ITU-T Study Group 15 determined a Recommendation that defines Y.1731 based operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. This decision sets the stage for a divergence in MPLS development; it creates a situation where some vendors will use the IETF standard for MPLS OAM while other vendors implement the ITU-T Recommendation for OAM. This situation ensures that the two product groups will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet, which is an interoperable network of networks.

Russ Housley, IETF chair, commented; “The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. After we have worked so long and so hard together to ensure that MPLS OAM products from all vendors around the world would be compatible with each other, I am surprised and disappointed by the action taken by the ITU-T today, which takes us off the path of global interoperability for this technology. The decision is all the more regrettable because the IETF is just completing work on the first major phase of extensions to MPLS OAM protocols for use in transport networks.”

Furthermore, this ITU-T SG15 action represents a serious breach of the IETF/ ITU-T Joint Working Team (JWT) agreement. This JWT was commissioned by the ITU-T and IETF to examine the feasibility of a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements. The team unanimously agreed that a single viable solution had been identified;  their report was completed in April 2008 and accepted in December 2008. This JWT Report states not only that a single solution was possible but also recommended an approach where protocol development for MPLS-TP would be undertaken by the IETF. The IETF and ITU-T independently accepted and endorsed the JWT report. The ITU-T committed to the IETF that they would abide by the JWT recommendations and recognized the IETF as the design authority for MPLS. Furthermore, the JWT confirmed that it was technically feasible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet the requirements of a transport profile, now called MPLS-TP. Since the acceptance of the JWT Report, both organizations have worked constructively until now.

“Resolution 101 represented the clear wishes of the member states of the ITU, and was agreed at the ITU’s Plenipotentiary conference less than six months ago. That Resolution was agreed at the highest level of the Union, and yet SG15 has taken action that directly contradicts it,” said Lynn St. Amour, president and CEO of the Internet Society.

“The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification, and the IETF leadership is considering the best way to proceed in light of this surprising development,” added Russ Housley.  “At this point, our goal is to minimize the negative consequences of this unfortunate situation. The priority is to establish a measured and careful approach that protects the stability of the Internet while enabling it to grow to serve the entire world-wide population.”

Although the ITU-T SG15 decision is disappointing, in an ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF will continue to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

When two non-interoperable standards are developed, there are only two possible outcomes: if both technologies are deployed, there will be confusion, if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Russ Housley concluded, “The IETF leadership continues to believe that a single OAM solution will better serve the continued growth of Internet, and we hope that the ITU-T leadership will also come to recognize the benefits of a single globally interoperable solution.”

""

Chapter Update: Ghana

Contributed by: Ebenezer Dadzie

The Internet Society Ghana Chapter is about to launch a series of ‘Social Evenings’, to which all the Chapter members are invited. The first event in this series will take place on Friday 25 February 2011 at 6:30 PM at the Guest House of the Social Security and National Insurance Trust (SSNIT) in Accra, Ghana.
The topic for the event is “Social Networks- Benefits and Challenges” and the evening will be chaired by Nii Quaynor, Chair of the National Information Technology Agency (NITA) as well as Chair of the Board of the Internet Society Ghana Chapter.

The topics that will be discussed include social networking, security, privacy and content policy. Among the panelists will be representatives from the Ghana ISP Association, the National Communications Authority (NCA), the Internet Society Ghana Chapter and other sectors.

Find out more on the Internet Society Ghana Chapter’s website: http://www.isoc.org.gh

""

Chapter Update: Chad

Contributed by: Abdarahim Youssouf

Le projet School Net du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society a, dans le cadre de ses activités “Cyber élève”, le plaisir d’informer les élèves et étudiants qui désirent devenir membre de son club Internet de se manifester pour bénéficier des avantages suivants :

  • Le statut “Cyber élève” donne droit à une réduction du prix de connexion internet tous les jours
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent bénéficier d’une assistance pour leurs recherches de cours, d’exposés, de documentation, de mémoire etc.
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent assister aux débats sur Internet, qui ont lieu chaque semaine.
  • Et, ils/elles peuvent aussi bénéficier d’une assistance pour se perfectionner dans le domaine de l’usage de Facebook, Yahoo, Hotmail, Tagget, etc.

Le Club Internet du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society est aussi un lieu d’échanges entre les internautes avancés et les débutants.

""

Chapter Update: Australia

Contributed by: Holly Raiche

Tony Hill, President of the Australia Chapter and chair of the Asia Pacific IPv6 Task Force, attended the IPv6 Transition Conference at the joint meeting of APRICOT 2011, APAN and APNIC31 in Hong Kong on 22 February.  The meeting was assembled by a joint program committee and attracted interest from many organisations with major contributions from the Internet Society and APNIC.  Speakers were also present from Facebook, Google and Akamai who explained their current experience with IPv6 and plans for the Internet Society organised World IPv6-day to be held for 24 hours on 8 June 2011.

Vice President Narelle Clark continues participation in the review of the national consumer protection code on telecommunications (including Internet users).

We are also organising a joint seminar with the IEEE for March, with Narelle as speaker, titled “The Internet’s Off Switch: Wikileaks, Arab Protests and Beyond’.

""

Chapter Update: Belgium

Contributed by: Rudi Vansnick

Internet Society Belgium Chapter joins European commission SSEDIC project

Earlier this month the final agreement between the European Commission and the consortium presenting the proposal has been signed. The SSEDIC project is now a reality.

Over the course of the next three years, 35 partners will work closely together, forming groups to discuss s the political, economic, social, technical, legal and environmental aspects of a single European digital community.

The 35 partner stakeholders and the initial additional associated partners we introduce here (who have strongly expressed interest in participating) are only the start of this stakeholder network. The aim of this network is to build a community of high level European and international experts over the next three years. This community will be built via virtual tools: a dedicated online workspace, online conferences as well as via real live events integrated in the EEMA conference agenda and other major European Commission events.

During this process, the Internet Society Belgium Chapter will focus on the consumer and of course will call on each of the Internet Society Chapters in Europe to participate.

More details about this project can be found on http://www.eid-ssedic.eu/

Internet Society Belgium Chapter is participating in international events

On Tuesday 15/2 the Internet Society Belgium Chapter chair spoke in Albania during the Child protection conference. During the event,  meetings were scheduled to discuss the establishment of an Albanian chapter. The process of creating the basics of the chapter is now ongoing.

Internet Society Belgium Chapter organises WSA Belgium 2011

We are in the process of selecting the 8 best e-Content projects for Belgium – an activity we have undertaken previously in 2005, 2007 and 2009. Those chosen will be nominated for the world contest.

""

Don’t take the Internet for granted, Internet Society warns at INET conference

Global organisation urges Internet users to act to keep the Internet open and transparent

23 Frankfurt 2011, FRANKFURT – The Internet Society warned today that taking the Internet for granted would be one of the surest ways to ruin it.

At its INET conference in Frankfurt on the threats, challenges and opportunities facing the Internet, the Internet Society cautioned users that they would take it for granted at their peril.

“The future success of the Internet is heavily dependent on its openness, access and transparency,” said  Frederic Donck, director of the Internet Society’s European Regional Bureau. “Remove any of these core attributes, and the Internet will be become virtually useless as a platform for communication and innovation.”

The Internet Society called on all users to take urgent steps to ensure that the future development of the Internet takes a course that is in the best interests of everyone.

“We cannot afford not to engage now as big decisions are being made on the future of the Internet that will have a direct impact on our business and social lives. Complacency over such vital issues as net neutrality, security, privacy and data protection is simply not an option,” Mr Donck said.

To this end, the Internet Society is launching the first global 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol, to take off on June 8, to enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness as the pool of existing IPv4 addresses dries up. Already, leading Internet industry names Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco, among others, have committed to join the trial.

At today’s conference, to Illustrate the potential for a future Internet very different than the one used today, the Internet Society will screen videos of four scenarios that highlight contrasting paths along which it could develop.

Of the four scenarios, the Internet Society advocates The Common Pool, in which the Internet continues to be built on open technologies and processes, fostering permission-less innovation, economic growth, and social development.

Mr Donck acknowledged the concerns of many citizens in Germany and elsewhere about privacy and data protection, but he emphasised the importance of safeguarding the unique qualities of the Internet in the face of any public pressure for tougher measures.

“Knee-jerk reactions over privacy and data protection – or any other Internet-related issue, for that matter – would simply be counter-productive, putting at risk the very qualities that make the Internet an indispensable successful social and business tool worldwide,” he said.

A speaker at today’s conference, Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, said: “The need for effective data protection is now greater than ever before, in a world where concerns about privacy are increasing, as citizens discover how new technologies are impacting on their lives.”

A panel debate on network confidence and privacy will feature Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft’s senior regulatory policy manager for EMEA and Ramses Martinez, Verisign’s information security director.

Rick Falkvinge, founder of the Swedish Pirate Party, also a speaker at the INET, said: “The key challenges for the Internet today are no longer technical, but political. The technology is causing a power shift as large as the printing press did, and a lot of powerful people would rather cripple
the net than let their power shift to the masses.

James M. Galvin, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards at Afilias, sponsor of the INET, said: “Along with common goals of openness, access and transparency, the future of the Internet depends on the ongoing adoption of common technical standards like IPv6 and DNSSEC. Afilias is proud to have helped lead the way in implementing these standards, and looks forward to sharing our technical knowledge as part of the Internet Society.”

For the announcement in German visit here.

""

„Das Internet ist nicht selbstverständlich“, warnt die Internet Society auf der INET Konferenz

Die globale Organisation drängt Internetnutzer zu handeln, um ein offenes und transparentes Internet zu erhalten

23. Februar 2011, FRANKFURT am Main – Die Internet Society warnte heute, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu sehen, wäre einer der sichersten Wege, es zu ruinieren.

Auf der INET Konfernez zu den Gefahren, Herausforderungen und Chancen des Internet, mahnte die Internet Society Internetnutzer zur Vorsicht, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu nehmen.

“Die Zukunftsfähigkeit des Internet hängt stark von seiner Offenheit, Zugänglichkeit und Transparenz ab“, sagte Frederic Donck, Leiter des Europa-Büros der Internet Society. „Nehmen wir nur eine dieser Schlüsseleigenschaften weg, und das Internet wird als Kommunikations- und Innovationsplattform praktisch nutzlos.“

Die Internet Society rief alle Nutzer zu dringenden Schritten auf, um sicherzustellen, dass die Entwicklung des Internet eine Richtung nimmt, die im besten Interesse von allen ist.

„Wir können es uns nicht leisten, nicht zu reagieren, gerade jetzt, da wichtige Entscheidungen zur Zukunft des Internet getroffen werden, die einen direkten Einfluss auf unser Business und soziales Leben haben werden. Zufriedenheit mit so wichtigen Themen wie Netzneutralität, Sicherheit, Datenschutz und –sichereit ist einfach keine Option“, sagte Donck.

Dazu launched die Internet Society den ersten weltweiten 24-Stunden „Testflug“ der nächsten Gernation des Internet Protokoll. Der soll am 8. Juni starten, um der Industrie die Möglichkeit zu geben, die IPv6-Bereitschaft zu testen, da sich der Pool der bestehenden IPv4-Adressen dem Ende zuneigt. Führende Internet-Unternehmen wie Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco haben bereits zugesagt, an dem Versuch teilzunehmen.

Bei der heutigen Konferenz illustriert die Internet Society die Möglichkeit eines zukünftigen Internet, das sich sehr von dem heutigen unterscheiden wird. Mit Szenario-Videos zeigt die Internet Society auf der Konferenz vier unterschiedliche Wege, wie sich das Internet entwickeln könnte.

Von diesen vier Szenarien befürwortet die Internet Society „The Common Pool“. Dabei setzt das Internet auch in Zukunft offene Technologien und Prozesse voraus und unterstützt so unkomplizierte Innovation, wirtschaftliches Wachstum und soziale Entwicklungen.

Frederic Donck sieht die Bedenken über Datenschutz und –sicherheit vieler Bürger in Deutschland und anderswo, aber er betont, dass es wichtig ist, die einzigartigen Qualitäten des Internet gegenüber dem öffentlichen Druck für strengere Maßnahmen zu schützen.

“Reflexreaktionen zu Datenschutz und -sicherheit – sowie zu jedem anderen Internetbezogenen Problem, auf das es ankommt – wären einfach kontraproduktiv, da wir so die einzigartigen Qualitäten aufs Spiel setzen, die das Internet zu einem unverzichtbaren, erfolgreichen sozialem und geschäftlichem Instrument weltweit machen“, sagte er.

Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, und Sprecher auf der heutigen Konferenz sagt: „Die Notwendigkeit eines effektiven Datenschutzes ist jetzt größer als jemals zuvor, in einer Welt, in der Sorge über Datenschutz wächst, da Bürger entdecken, wie neue Technologien Einfluss auf ihr Leben nehmen.“

An der Diskussionsrund über Netzwerksicherheit und Datenschutz nehmen Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft Senior Regulatory Policy Manager und Ramses Martinez, Verisign Information Security Director, teil.

Rick Falkvinge, Gründer der Schwedischen Piratenpartei, ist ebenfalls Sprecher bei der INET-Konferenz und sagt: „Die wichtigsten Herausforderungen für das Internet sind heute nicht mehr technisch, sondern politisch. Die Technolgie verursacht eine Machtverschiebung, so groß wie damals die Druckpresse, und viele mächtige Leute würden lieber das Netz stark beschädigen als zuzulassen, dass sich ihre Macht zu den Massen verschiebt.“

James M. Galve, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards bei Afilias und Sponsor der INET, sagt: „Die Zukunft des Internet hängt neben den gemeinsamen Zielen Offenheit, Zugang und Transparenz von der permanenten Anpassung an technische Standards wie IPv6 und DNSSEC ab. Afilias ist stolz geholfen zu haben, den Weg für die Einführung dieser Standards zu bereiten und wir freuen uns darauf, unsere technischen Fachkenntnisse als Teil der Internet Society zu teilen.“

""

Chapter Update: India Kolkata

Contributed by: Niel Hirjee

A two day Hands-On IPv6 Workshop was organized by the Internet Society India Kolkata Chapter in association with APNIC (Asia Pacific Network Information Centre) and co-sponsored by NIXI (National Internet Exchange of India).

The workshop was held on January 31 and February 1, 2011 at the Hotel Indismart at Salt Lake Electronics Complex, the heart of the IT industry of Kolkata. Thirty five people from Kolkata and the neighboring cities of Siliguri, Gauhati, Bokaro and even a few from New Delhi, representing diverse organizations such as Airtel, Indian Cablenet, WEBEL, Net4India, Ortel Communication, Rail Tel, STPI, TCS and Wipro, amongst others, attended the workshop.

Four ISOC India Kolkata Chapter members namely, Anand Raje, Anupam Agarwal, Niel Hirjee and Ritwick Majumder also received training under the train the trainer model to enable them carry out more workshops on IPv6 to build capacity in the region.

Champika Wijayatunga and Vivek Nigam of APNIC conducted the workshop and included a live and hands-on session on router configuration for IPv6, which was much appreciated by all.

This was the second IPv6 workshop organized by the Chapter. It was fully booked a week before the event and had 100% attendance.

""

Community Grants Programme Project Showcase: Dili Village Telco

Contributed by: David Rowe, Global Member (May 2010 grantee)

The Dili Village Telco project is building a 100 node mesh telephony network in Dili, Timor Leste.  Since the project started 12 months ago, we have installed 60 nodes in Dili, and 10 each in the regional towns of Baucau and Ermera.  This network is in daily use, providing free telephone calls between NGOs.

Like many developing countries, GSM phone calls are very expensive in Timor.  In some areas there is no telephone network.  Even a call to an office a few 100m way costs the equivalent of a few hours wages for a local person.  So every free phone call our network delivers is like a valuable gift – removing the current “tax” on telecommunications.  This frees up valuable NGO funds for other important operations, and creates tighter links between organisations.

The end user response to the Dili Village Telco has been amazing.  The staff of NGOs want them at home, and Fongtil (our Timorese partner organisation in the project) receives continual requests for new nodes.  The Mesh Potato Hardware (a Wifi router with a telephone port) has proven rugged and reliable in the tropical environment of Timor.

We have also had excellent results in technology transfer and training. Local Timorese have trained each other in Mesh Potato configuration and installation.  This makes the spread of Village Telco technology potentially viral, as no expensive first-world consultants are required.

Our Internet Society 2010 grant-funded activities are now drawing to a close, but Fongtil are so pleased that they have committed their own resources to expanding the network across Dili and other Timorese districts in 2011.

Please click here for additional information about the Community Grants Programme, including pictures.

""

Chapter Update: Mexico

Contributed by: Alejandro Pisanty

The Internet Society Mexico Chapter actively participated in local Internet policy activities during February 2008.

In particular, there has been intense activity around the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, ACTA. This will soon be put forward for signature, and is considered to contain risks to the Internet.

Several members – Erik Huesca, Leon Felipe Sanchez, Carmen Rodriguez-Armenta, Emilio Saldaña, and others including the Chapter Chair, Alejandro Pisanty, took part in the open consultations called for by the Senate of the Republic, through its Plural Technical group on ACTA.

The group of Internet Society Mexico Chapter members has had a distinguished participation in these debates, conveying Internet principles and calling for open, multi-stakeholder discussion of this and other matters of Internet Governance. Some of the group’s proposals have been taken into consideration by the Senate from its first session. The consultations will continue into April 2011.

""

Chapter Update: Armenia

Contributed by Igor Mkrtumyan

1. The .AM zone was set up for DNSSEC and signed.

2. The Internet Society Armenia Chapter widely advertised “The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!” and “World IPv6 Day” programs. As a result we have witnessed a considerable increase in membership applications.

3. A Task Force for IPv6 deployment was formed including representatives of the Internet Society Armenia Chapter, the National Academy of Sciences, the Armenian NREN and the leading Armenian ISP. The Task Force drafted a letter to the prime minister proposing a plan for IPv6 deployment in Armenia.

4. The Armenian Internet Exchange (ArmIX) Board of Trustees meeting discussed the wording of the service level agreement with ArmIX stakeholders and methods for advancing the ISPs connection to the ArmIX.

3. Thirty teachers from the Dsegh village school were trained in Internet applications with the help of an Internet Society Armenia Chapter grant. Staff of the Regional Internet Community Center of Vanadzor city, an Internet Society grantee, provided the training. The trained teachers will soon start providing corresponding training to schoolchildren.

""

Chapter Update: Senegal

FRANCAIS

Le 15 Janvier 2011 s’est tenu à la Salle de Réception de Magic Land à Dakar, le premier dîner débat organisé par le chapitre du Sénégal de l’Internet Society.

Ce dîner a été l’occasion de réunir près d’une centaine de participants de différents secteurs dont des professionnels des TICs, des universitaires, des ONG et des agents de l’état.

L’objectif général de la soirée était de discuter autour d’aspects importants liés à l’Internet (défini dans le cadre du One Web Day 2010) au Sénégal :

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

Cela a permis de faire le point sur l’état de l’Internet au Sénégal et d’étudier les potentiels amélioration quand à l’utilisation et à la gouvernance de l’Internet au Sénégal.

Hormis le débat, le dîner était également l’occasion d’attribuer le prix Internet Society Sénégal décerné par l’équipe “Next Generation” à la « Personnalité » et/ou à l’« Entreprise » ayant le plus oeuvré dans la promotion et le développement de l’Internet au Sénégal durant l’année 2010.

Pour cette première édition le prix ont été décernés à :

- Monsieur Mouhamed Tidiane SECK, au titre de la personnalité;

- Et à la SONATEL SA, au titre des entreprises.

ANGLAIS

On 15 January 2011, the first dinner debate organized by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter was held in the Reception Room of Magic Land in Dakar.

The dinner was an opportunity to meet close to a hundred participants from various sectors including ICT professionals, academics, NGO and state officials.

The overall goal of the evening was to discuss about important issues related to Internet (defined at the One Web Day 2010) in Senegal:

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

This helped to review the state of the Internet in Senegal and study potential improvements in the use and governance of the Internet in Senegal.

Apart from the debate, the dinner was also the occasion to award the prize awarded by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter Team “Next Generation” to a “Personality” and a “Company” that have most worked in the promotion and development of the Internet in Senegal during 2010.

For this first edition, the prize were awarded to :

-      Mr Mouhamed Tidiane Seck, as personality;

-      And to Sonatel SA as the company.

""

Chapter Needs Survey and Smartphone Winner

Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres – le gagnant du smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, le gagnant du smartphone suite au tirage au sort après l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society, résume son expérience comme suit:

Ma participation au “Chapter Needs Survey” était très importante à trois niveaux:

1. Pour Internet Society en général car elle a permis aux gestionnaires des programmes et projets de l’Internet Society de recueillir les informations sur la perception des bénéficiaires vis a vis des actions de l’Internet Society.

2. Pour les Chapitres, c’était une occasion pour donner des orientations sur la manière dont leurs communautés Internet locales souhaiteraient être assistées par l’Internet Society.

3. En tant que gestionnaire de Chapitre, participer au sondage était aussi une occasion de me poser les questions sur la manière dont les activités de mon Chapitre sont perçues par la communauté locale et de savoir comment améliorer nos services.

Quant au smartphone, je suis ravi d’être le gagnant car il me permet d’être constamment connecté.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule est vice-président du chapitre de la République Démocratique du Congo de l’Internet Society.

Les résultats de l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society sont disponibles sur le site internet de l’Internet Society:

En français: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

En anglais: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

En espagnol: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

Internet Society Chapter Needs Survey – Winner of the smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, winner of the smartphone through the lucky prize draw following the Chapter Needs Survey, summarizes his experience as follows:

My participation in the “Chapter Needs Survey” was very important at three different levels:

1. For the Internet Society in general, since it has allowed the managers of the various Internet Society programmes and projects to collect information on the perceptions of the beneficiaries of ISOC’s actions.

2. For the Chapters, it was an occasion to provide guidance on how their local Internet communities like to be assisted by the Internet Society.

3. As a Chapter Officer, participating in the survey was also an opportunity to ask myself how the local community perceives my Chapter’s activities and how our services could be improved.

As for the Smartphone, I am delighted to be the winner because it allows me to be constantly connected.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule is vice president of the Internet Society Democratic Republic of Congo Chapter.

The results of the Internet Society’s Chapter Needs Survey are available on the Internet Society website:

English: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

French: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

Spanish: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

""

Leading Access and Hosting Providers to Join Internet Society’s IPv6 Test Flight

First global scale trial of IPv6 to take place on June 8, 2011

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND and RESTON, VIRGINIA, USA – 15 February 2011 – Comcast [Nasdaq: CMCSA], Time Warner Cable [NYSE:TWC], SoftLayer Technologies and Rackspace Hosting ( NYSE:RAX) today joined the ranks of Internet industry players committing to participate in World IPv6 Day, a global event coordinated by the Internet Society. This first global scale 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol on June 8 will enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness and prepare for seamless full deployment.

“Network operators of all sorts have been building in support for IPv6, not just websites and content hosting providers,” commented Leslie Daigle, the Internet Society’s Chief Internet Technology officer. “Networks that provide access to millions of end users complete the connection between Internet content and services and consumers of those services. Adding major access and hosting providers who are committed to World IPv6 Day is further illustration of the growing momentum around IPv6 deployment.”

A seamless transition to IPv6 is critical to enable the Internet to continue to grow to connect billions of new people and devices. This opportunity to test IPv6 readiness is a critical step in working to identify areas for improvement. One of the goals of World IPv6 Day is to expose potential issues under controlled conditions and address them as soon as possible. Scheduling the event for a 24-hour period on June 8 gives participants the opportunity to ready their systems for an industry-wide “test-flight” while working together to plan for long-term deployment of IPv6.

“World IPv6 Day is important to further the deployment and wide spread enablement of IPv6,” said John Brzozowski, Chief Architect for IPv6 and Distinguished Engineer at Comcast. “Being able to test our infrastructure at scale and verify our customers’ experience is essential to seamless enablement.”

“We’re working hard to make IPv6 available to our customers,” said Lee Howard, Director of Network Technology for Time Warner Cable.  ”All transitions have risks, and we’re glad to be working together to minimize those risks with this significant test.”

“SoftLayer is a hosting provider, but the network is an absolutely essential part of our business. Without a robust network in place, we will simply fail our customers,” said Will Charnock, Vice President, Engineering and Operations, “For that reason, SoftLayer has provided native IPv6 support to our publicly available services since December 2008. World IPv6 Day is an important one for the industry and we are pleased to participate.”

“We look forward to working with World IPv6 Day partners, industry participants and customers to help test and validate IPv6 capabilities and deployments,” said Jason Ackley, lead architect for IPv6 at Rackspace.  “Our participation in World IPv6 Day is another step in furthering the industry’s ability to work together to anticipate and solve real-world issues affecting us all while delivering sustainable long-term solutions for Internet growth. ”

The vast majority of users should be able to access services as usual, but in rare cases, mis-configured or misbehaving network equipment, particularly in home networks, may impair access to participating websites during the trial. Current estimates are that 0.05% of users may experience such problems, but participating organizations are working together with operating system manufacturers, home router vendors and ISPs to minimize the number of users affected. Participants will also be working together to provide tools to detect problems and offer suggested fixes in advance of the trial.

For more information about World IPv6 Day, how to get involved, and links to useful information for users, visit www.internetsociety.org/worldipv6day.

About the need for IPv6

IPv4 has approximately four billion IP addresses (the sequence of numbers assigned to each Internet-connected device). The explosion in the number of people, devices and web services on the Internet means that IPv4 is running out of space. IPv6, the next-generation Internet protocol, which provides over four billion times more space, will connect the billions of people not connected today and will help ensure the Internet can continue its current growth rate.

Read what the participating companies are doing to prepare for IPv6 deployment here:

Comcast’s IPv6 Information Center

IPv6 – Preparing for the new protocol

Rackspace IPv6 Roadmap Update

Softlayer and IPv6

""

Chapter Update: Germany

ISOC.DE gaining momentum

A few months ago ISOC.DE relaunched its website http://www.isoc.de/.

The old site was focused on rather static information about the Internet Society German Chapter, used plain HTML authoring and was infrequently updated.

The new page is build around a blog platform to better serve the Internet Society Germany Chapter membership and the public. Information about political, technical and Internet Society Germany Chapter events, projects and initiatives is presented and discussed. The new Internet Society Germany Chapter website presents this information regionally or globally by syndicating RSS news from IETF, the Internet Society and the local Office of W3C .

By expanding its Web presence, the  Internet Society Germany Chapter aims to gain more visibility and be more proactive in contributing to a neutral and open Internet for the benefit of the German community.

""

Chapter Update: USA San Francisco

Contributed by: Annalisa Roger, Vice-chair of the San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of the Internet Society

Dot-NXT Highlights What’s Next for the Internet

San Francisco, CA – The energy was palpable and the discussion was vibrant at the Dot-NXT Conference Feb 8 – 10, hosted by The San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of The Internet Society and managed by chapter member Kieren McCarthy with chapter member volunteers. The room was filled with Domain Name industry CEOs, entrepreneurs, investors and others all interested in participating in the biggest change of the expanding Internet that the world has yet to witness. The conference was a success as it facilitated a rich discussion between industry professionals and global stakeholders, who interacted directly with the audience of almost 200 in a lively discussion. The exchange created an understanding of many potential benefits as well as challenges for these new gTLDs. There was a focus in several sessions on how to create the best application for a new gTLD, how to optimize the launching and the importance of insuring that the true and maximum benefits to a community are realized from the TLD launch through running the domain into the future.

Dot-NXT, the first conference of its kind, was about the remarkable change that will soon cause Internet users around the world to take a new look at TLDs.  For starters, the world will begin “seeing” "" Level Domains. This is for two reasons: first, "" Level Domains are taking on a new and public face beyond their technical function. They will be recognizable markers for brands, communities, geographic locations, lifestyles, industries, causes and unlimited other interests. Second, new "" Level Domains are expected to arrive in droves on the Internet as early as 2012 and 2013.

The opening session was crowded as attendees listened to Kurt Pritz, Sr. Vice President for Stakeholder Relations of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Pritz, who leads ICANN’s implementation of the new gTLD program, describes the new TLD opportunity and application process as available to anyone interested in putting in an application to ICANN. Some think of the new TLD opportunity as a land rush of cyber real-estate with a price tag of $185,000. Experts caution it will not be easy to make it through the complex and lengthy evaluation created by the multi-stakeholder process at ICANN. Applications include proof and detail of robust technical qualifications and ability, background checks, business model evaluations, and proposed policies and governance over the name space as well as financial viability including insurance to maintain operability for 3-5 years in the form of cash reserves or a letter of credit. And the all-important component: support from the community the applicant proposes to serve.  Alternatively, affected communities may file objections to applications.

Industry experts shared their knowledge openly with specific tips and suggestions for launching new gTLDs. All the services and expertise needed by a gTLD applicant could have been hired in this one conference room. These experts, found here at this address: http://dot-nxt.com/speakers-by-session covered Marketing, Policy – application rules, how and when to apply; Implementation – working with registrars and running a registry; Back to the Future; New Extensions – new opportunity; Reality Check and more. Networking began at the cocktail party February 8, and active participants discussed and made deals with industry service providers at the small tables provided outside the session rooms throughout the next two days.

Juan Diego Calle, the ambitious and inspiring founder and CEO of .CO Internet S.A.S., the registry operator for the .CO "" Level Domain, was a highlight of the conference. He replayed the recent Superbowl ad featuring Joan Rivers for .CO and the popular “O.co” commercial, the new and hip identity for Overstock.com. Calle delivered a road map to his path of success with the .co domain, a re-delegation of Colombia’s country code TLD.  Under Juan’s leadership, .CO was launched internationally in July of 2010, and has quickly become one of the most successful domain registry launches in history, with more than 700,000 domain names registered by people and companies in 200 countries worldwide.

""

The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!

Do you have friends who, like you, are interested in joining an active global community focused on helping shape the future of the Internet?

Find out more about how you can invite your friends by logging into the Internet Society Member Portal at https://portal.isoc.org.

The Internet Society currently has more than 80 local Chapters worldwide. If you are not a member of a Chapter yet, we invite you to join one and thus support the Internet Society’s work at both local and regional levels.

A list of all Internet Society Chapters can be found at: http://www.isoc.org/isoc/chapters/list/

An active and growing membership is important to advance the Internet Society’s mission and sustain Internet Society Chapters.

""

Chapter Update: Philippines Chapter

Contributed by: Rodel Urani

The Internet Society Philippines Chapter, Advance Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) and Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) organized the 2011 Philippine IPv6 Conference and Training from 24-27 January 2011 at the Makati Shangri-la Hotel in Manila.

The four-day event was a multi-sector campaign to promote the “next generation” Internet Protocol, commonly known as IPv6. The event provided an opportunity for everyone to share information from government, business and non-government organizations, and learn about IPv6 through APNIC’s hands-on training conducted by Mr. Jeffrey Tosco. The conference was also available through live video streaming facilitated by PREGINET,  spearheaded by Mr. Bani Lara, who is also now the Internet Society Philippines Chapter Secretary.

Alongside the event we successfully elected Internet Society Philippines Chapter officers. The participation of members at this juncture was a testament to a renewed commitment to the Chapter, its Internet Society mandate and the country and its local constituents. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter with its newly elected board of trustees named Mr. Randall Lozano as President, Ms. Charity Gamboa as Vice President and Mr. Winthrop Yu as Treasurer.

The event’s keynote speaker, the Honorable Chairman Ivan John Uy of the CICT, a known cyber law expert and distinguished professorial lecturer at various universities, spoke about the importance of a multi-stakeholder approach among government businesses. Mr. Uy confirmed the signing of the rules and regulation (IRR) of the executive order (E.O.) 893, a directive stating that all government agencies’ online services to be IPv6 compliant and still interoperable with the legacy IPv4 addressing within two years. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter was one of the organizations invited to participate during the formulation of the IRR.

Another distinguished speaker was Director Denis Villorente of ASTI, who presented ASTI’s projects, including PREGINET, the country’s only national research and education network (NREN) that has links to international research and education networks, and PHOpenIX, the Philippines’ first and now one of the IPv6 enabled Internet exchanges in the country.

Our resource speakers, Ms. Miwa Fujii of APNIC, shared details of the final countdown to IPv4 exhaustion and the increasing IPv6 network activities within the Asia Pacific region. Mr. Ramon Cerezo talked about Eastern Communications’ readiness for IPv6 and Mr. Lawrence Hughes of InfoWeapons, about the “second” Internet or the use of IPv6 and the complexity involved in making an IPv6 network secure. Mr. Latif Ladid, the president of the IPv6 Forum, presented online from Luxembourg on the history behind of IPv4 depletion and his organization’s commitment to pushing IPv6 as the next generations Internet Protocol. Mr. Asif Kabani of the Internet Society Pakistan Chapter, also presented online Pakistan’s experience in IPv6 deployment.

Our final virtual speaker was Mr. Matthew Ford of the Internet Society whose presentation covered  IPv6 global deployment, momentum and milestones. Mr. Ford maintained that IPv6 is the only answer for a globally-connected Internet and recommended that organizations make IPv6 transition a priority. He also urged them to accelerate deployment and communicate plans and status, especially to the public.

""

ISOC Member Newsletter. Suggestions, comments, and questions welcome to, newsletter@isoc.org

ISOC's key initiatives target the critical issues that affect all aspects of Internet development and growth. They embody ISOC's philosophy that the Internet is for everyone and they provide the organization with a solid foundation from which to positively influence standards development, access, business practices, and government policies.

Russ Housley, IETF chair, commented; “The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. After we have worked so long and so hard together to ensure that MPLS OAM products from all vendors around the world would be compatible with each other, I am surprised and disappointed by the action taken by the ITU-T today, which takes us off the path of global interoperability for this technology. The decision is all the more regrettable because the IETF is just completing work on the first major phase of extensions to MPLS OAM protocols for use in transport networks.”

Furthermore, this ITU-T SG15 action represents a serious breach of the IETF/ ITU-T Joint Working Team (JWT) agreement. This JWT was commissioned by the ITU-T and IETF to examine the feasibility of a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements. The team unanimously agreed that a single viable solution had been identified;  their report was completed in April 2008 and accepted in December 2008. This JWT Report states not only that a single solution was possible but also recommended an approach where protocol development for MPLS-TP would be undertaken by the IETF. The IETF and ITU-T independently accepted and endorsed the JWT report. The ITU-T committed to the IETF that they would abide by the JWT recommendations and recognized the IETF as the design authority for MPLS. Furthermore, the JWT confirmed that it was technically feasible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet the requirements of a transport profile, now called MPLS-TP. Since the acceptance of the JWT Report, both organizations have worked constructively until now.

“Resolution 101 represented the clear wishes of the member states of the ITU, and was agreed at the ITU’s Plenipotentiary conference less than six months ago. That Resolution was agreed at the highest level of the Union, and yet SG15 has taken action that directly contradicts it,” said Lynn St. Amour, president and CEO of the Internet Society.

“The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification, and the IETF leadership is considering the best way to proceed in light of this surprising development,” added Russ Housley.  “At this point, our goal is to minimize the negative consequences of this unfortunate situation. The priority is to establish a measured and careful approach that protects the stability of the Internet while enabling it to grow to serve the entire world-wide population.”

Although the ITU-T SG15 decision is disappointing, in an ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF will continue to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

When two non-interoperable standards are developed, there are only two possible outcomes: if both technologies are deployed, there will be confusion, if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Russ Housley concluded, “The IETF leadership continues to believe that a single OAM solution will better serve the continued growth of Internet, and we hope that the ITU-T leadership will also come to recognize the benefits of a single globally interoperable solution.”

""

Chapter Update: Ghana

Contributed by: Ebenezer Dadzie

The Internet Society Ghana Chapter is about to launch a series of ‘Social Evenings’, to which all the Chapter members are invited. The first event in this series will take place on Friday 25 February 2011 at 6:30 PM at the Guest House of the Social Security and National Insurance Trust (SSNIT) in Accra, Ghana.
The topic for the event is “Social Networks- Benefits and Challenges” and the evening will be chaired by Nii Quaynor, Chair of the National Information Technology Agency (NITA) as well as Chair of the Board of the Internet Society Ghana Chapter.

The topics that will be discussed include social networking, security, privacy and content policy. Among the panelists will be representatives from the Ghana ISP Association, the National Communications Authority (NCA), the Internet Society Ghana Chapter and other sectors.

Find out more on the Internet Society Ghana Chapter’s website: http://www.isoc.org.gh

""

Chapter Update: Chad

Contributed by: Abdarahim Youssouf

Le projet School Net du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society a, dans le cadre de ses activités “Cyber élève”, le plaisir d’informer les élèves et étudiants qui désirent devenir membre de son club Internet de se manifester pour bénéficier des avantages suivants :

  • Le statut “Cyber élève” donne droit à une réduction du prix de connexion internet tous les jours
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent bénéficier d’une assistance pour leurs recherches de cours, d’exposés, de documentation, de mémoire etc.
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent assister aux débats sur Internet, qui ont lieu chaque semaine.
  • Et, ils/elles peuvent aussi bénéficier d’une assistance pour se perfectionner dans le domaine de l’usage de Facebook, Yahoo, Hotmail, Tagget, etc.

Le Club Internet du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society est aussi un lieu d’échanges entre les internautes avancés et les débutants.

""

Chapter Update: Australia

Contributed by: Holly Raiche

Tony Hill, President of the Australia Chapter and chair of the Asia Pacific IPv6 Task Force, attended the IPv6 Transition Conference at the joint meeting of APRICOT 2011, APAN and APNIC31 in Hong Kong on 22 February.  The meeting was assembled by a joint program committee and attracted interest from many organisations with major contributions from the Internet Society and APNIC.  Speakers were also present from Facebook, Google and Akamai who explained their current experience with IPv6 and plans for the Internet Society organised World IPv6-day to be held for 24 hours on 8 June 2011.

Vice President Narelle Clark continues participation in the review of the national consumer protection code on telecommunications (including Internet users).

We are also organising a joint seminar with the IEEE for March, with Narelle as speaker, titled “The Internet’s Off Switch: Wikileaks, Arab Protests and Beyond’.

""

Chapter Update: Belgium

Contributed by: Rudi Vansnick

Internet Society Belgium Chapter joins European commission SSEDIC project

Earlier this month the final agreement between the European Commission and the consortium presenting the proposal has been signed. The SSEDIC project is now a reality.

Over the course of the next three years, 35 partners will work closely together, forming groups to discuss s the political, economic, social, technical, legal and environmental aspects of a single European digital community.

The 35 partner stakeholders and the initial additional associated partners we introduce here (who have strongly expressed interest in participating) are only the start of this stakeholder network. The aim of this network is to build a community of high level European and international experts over the next three years. This community will be built via virtual tools: a dedicated online workspace, online conferences as well as via real live events integrated in the EEMA conference agenda and other major European Commission events.

During this process, the Internet Society Belgium Chapter will focus on the consumer and of course will call on each of the Internet Society Chapters in Europe to participate.

More details about this project can be found on http://www.eid-ssedic.eu/

Internet Society Belgium Chapter is participating in international events

On Tuesday 15/2 the Internet Society Belgium Chapter chair spoke in Albania during the Child protection conference. During the event,  meetings were scheduled to discuss the establishment of an Albanian chapter. The process of creating the basics of the chapter is now ongoing.

Internet Society Belgium Chapter organises WSA Belgium 2011

We are in the process of selecting the 8 best e-Content projects for Belgium – an activity we have undertaken previously in 2005, 2007 and 2009. Those chosen will be nominated for the world contest.

""

Don’t take the Internet for granted, Internet Society warns at INET conference

Global organisation urges Internet users to act to keep the Internet open and transparent

23 Frankfurt 2011, FRANKFURT – The Internet Society warned today that taking the Internet for granted would be one of the surest ways to ruin it.

At its INET conference in Frankfurt on the threats, challenges and opportunities facing the Internet, the Internet Society cautioned users that they would take it for granted at their peril.

“The future success of the Internet is heavily dependent on its openness, access and transparency,” said  Frederic Donck, director of the Internet Society’s European Regional Bureau. “Remove any of these core attributes, and the Internet will be become virtually useless as a platform for communication and innovation.”

The Internet Society called on all users to take urgent steps to ensure that the future development of the Internet takes a course that is in the best interests of everyone.

“We cannot afford not to engage now as big decisions are being made on the future of the Internet that will have a direct impact on our business and social lives. Complacency over such vital issues as net neutrality, security, privacy and data protection is simply not an option,” Mr Donck said.

To this end, the Internet Society is launching the first global 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol, to take off on June 8, to enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness as the pool of existing IPv4 addresses dries up. Already, leading Internet industry names Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco, among others, have committed to join the trial.

At today’s conference, to Illustrate the potential for a future Internet very different than the one used today, the Internet Society will screen videos of four scenarios that highlight contrasting paths along which it could develop.

Of the four scenarios, the Internet Society advocates The Common Pool, in which the Internet continues to be built on open technologies and processes, fostering permission-less innovation, economic growth, and social development.

Mr Donck acknowledged the concerns of many citizens in Germany and elsewhere about privacy and data protection, but he emphasised the importance of safeguarding the unique qualities of the Internet in the face of any public pressure for tougher measures.

“Knee-jerk reactions over privacy and data protection – or any other Internet-related issue, for that matter – would simply be counter-productive, putting at risk the very qualities that make the Internet an indispensable successful social and business tool worldwide,” he said.

A speaker at today’s conference, Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, said: “The need for effective data protection is now greater than ever before, in a world where concerns about privacy are increasing, as citizens discover how new technologies are impacting on their lives.”

A panel debate on network confidence and privacy will feature Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft’s senior regulatory policy manager for EMEA and Ramses Martinez, Verisign’s information security director.

Rick Falkvinge, founder of the Swedish Pirate Party, also a speaker at the INET, said: “The key challenges for the Internet today are no longer technical, but political. The technology is causing a power shift as large as the printing press did, and a lot of powerful people would rather cripple
the net than let their power shift to the masses.

James M. Galvin, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards at Afilias, sponsor of the INET, said: “Along with common goals of openness, access and transparency, the future of the Internet depends on the ongoing adoption of common technical standards like IPv6 and DNSSEC. Afilias is proud to have helped lead the way in implementing these standards, and looks forward to sharing our technical knowledge as part of the Internet Society.”

For the announcement in German visit here.

""

„Das Internet ist nicht selbstverständlich“, warnt die Internet Society auf der INET Konferenz

Die globale Organisation drängt Internetnutzer zu handeln, um ein offenes und transparentes Internet zu erhalten

23. Februar 2011, FRANKFURT am Main – Die Internet Society warnte heute, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu sehen, wäre einer der sichersten Wege, es zu ruinieren.

Auf der INET Konfernez zu den Gefahren, Herausforderungen und Chancen des Internet, mahnte die Internet Society Internetnutzer zur Vorsicht, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu nehmen.

“Die Zukunftsfähigkeit des Internet hängt stark von seiner Offenheit, Zugänglichkeit und Transparenz ab“, sagte Frederic Donck, Leiter des Europa-Büros der Internet Society. „Nehmen wir nur eine dieser Schlüsseleigenschaften weg, und das Internet wird als Kommunikations- und Innovationsplattform praktisch nutzlos.“

Die Internet Society rief alle Nutzer zu dringenden Schritten auf, um sicherzustellen, dass die Entwicklung des Internet eine Richtung nimmt, die im besten Interesse von allen ist.

„Wir können es uns nicht leisten, nicht zu reagieren, gerade jetzt, da wichtige Entscheidungen zur Zukunft des Internet getroffen werden, die einen direkten Einfluss auf unser Business und soziales Leben haben werden. Zufriedenheit mit so wichtigen Themen wie Netzneutralität, Sicherheit, Datenschutz und –sichereit ist einfach keine Option“, sagte Donck.

Dazu launched die Internet Society den ersten weltweiten 24-Stunden „Testflug“ der nächsten Gernation des Internet Protokoll. Der soll am 8. Juni starten, um der Industrie die Möglichkeit zu geben, die IPv6-Bereitschaft zu testen, da sich der Pool der bestehenden IPv4-Adressen dem Ende zuneigt. Führende Internet-Unternehmen wie Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco haben bereits zugesagt, an dem Versuch teilzunehmen.

Bei der heutigen Konferenz illustriert die Internet Society die Möglichkeit eines zukünftigen Internet, das sich sehr von dem heutigen unterscheiden wird. Mit Szenario-Videos zeigt die Internet Society auf der Konferenz vier unterschiedliche Wege, wie sich das Internet entwickeln könnte.

Von diesen vier Szenarien befürwortet die Internet Society „The Common Pool“. Dabei setzt das Internet auch in Zukunft offene Technologien und Prozesse voraus und unterstützt so unkomplizierte Innovation, wirtschaftliches Wachstum und soziale Entwicklungen.

Frederic Donck sieht die Bedenken über Datenschutz und –sicherheit vieler Bürger in Deutschland und anderswo, aber er betont, dass es wichtig ist, die einzigartigen Qualitäten des Internet gegenüber dem öffentlichen Druck für strengere Maßnahmen zu schützen.

“Reflexreaktionen zu Datenschutz und -sicherheit – sowie zu jedem anderen Internetbezogenen Problem, auf das es ankommt – wären einfach kontraproduktiv, da wir so die einzigartigen Qualitäten aufs Spiel setzen, die das Internet zu einem unverzichtbaren, erfolgreichen sozialem und geschäftlichem Instrument weltweit machen“, sagte er.

Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, und Sprecher auf der heutigen Konferenz sagt: „Die Notwendigkeit eines effektiven Datenschutzes ist jetzt größer als jemals zuvor, in einer Welt, in der Sorge über Datenschutz wächst, da Bürger entdecken, wie neue Technologien Einfluss auf ihr Leben nehmen.“

An der Diskussionsrund über Netzwerksicherheit und Datenschutz nehmen Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft Senior Regulatory Policy Manager und Ramses Martinez, Verisign Information Security Director, teil.

Rick Falkvinge, Gründer der Schwedischen Piratenpartei, ist ebenfalls Sprecher bei der INET-Konferenz und sagt: „Die wichtigsten Herausforderungen für das Internet sind heute nicht mehr technisch, sondern politisch. Die Technolgie verursacht eine Machtverschiebung, so groß wie damals die Druckpresse, und viele mächtige Leute würden lieber das Netz stark beschädigen als zuzulassen, dass sich ihre Macht zu den Massen verschiebt.“

James M. Galve, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards bei Afilias und Sponsor der INET, sagt: „Die Zukunft des Internet hängt neben den gemeinsamen Zielen Offenheit, Zugang und Transparenz von der permanenten Anpassung an technische Standards wie IPv6 und DNSSEC ab. Afilias ist stolz geholfen zu haben, den Weg für die Einführung dieser Standards zu bereiten und wir freuen uns darauf, unsere technischen Fachkenntnisse als Teil der Internet Society zu teilen.“

""

Chapter Update: India Kolkata

Contributed by: Niel Hirjee

A two day Hands-On IPv6 Workshop was organized by the Internet Society India Kolkata Chapter in association with APNIC (Asia Pacific Network Information Centre) and co-sponsored by NIXI (National Internet Exchange of India).

The workshop was held on January 31 and February 1, 2011 at the Hotel Indismart at Salt Lake Electronics Complex, the heart of the IT industry of Kolkata. Thirty five people from Kolkata and the neighboring cities of Siliguri, Gauhati, Bokaro and even a few from New Delhi, representing diverse organizations such as Airtel, Indian Cablenet, WEBEL, Net4India, Ortel Communication, Rail Tel, STPI, TCS and Wipro, amongst others, attended the workshop.

Four ISOC India Kolkata Chapter members namely, Anand Raje, Anupam Agarwal, Niel Hirjee and Ritwick Majumder also received training under the train the trainer model to enable them carry out more workshops on IPv6 to build capacity in the region.

Champika Wijayatunga and Vivek Nigam of APNIC conducted the workshop and included a live and hands-on session on router configuration for IPv6, which was much appreciated by all.

This was the second IPv6 workshop organized by the Chapter. It was fully booked a week before the event and had 100% attendance.

""

Community Grants Programme Project Showcase: Dili Village Telco

Contributed by: David Rowe, Global Member (May 2010 grantee)

The Dili Village Telco project is building a 100 node mesh telephony network in Dili, Timor Leste.  Since the project started 12 months ago, we have installed 60 nodes in Dili, and 10 each in the regional towns of Baucau and Ermera.  This network is in daily use, providing free telephone calls between NGOs.

Like many developing countries, GSM phone calls are very expensive in Timor.  In some areas there is no telephone network.  Even a call to an office a few 100m way costs the equivalent of a few hours wages for a local person.  So every free phone call our network delivers is like a valuable gift – removing the current “tax” on telecommunications.  This frees up valuable NGO funds for other important operations, and creates tighter links between organisations.

The end user response to the Dili Village Telco has been amazing.  The staff of NGOs want them at home, and Fongtil (our Timorese partner organisation in the project) receives continual requests for new nodes.  The Mesh Potato Hardware (a Wifi router with a telephone port) has proven rugged and reliable in the tropical environment of Timor.

We have also had excellent results in technology transfer and training. Local Timorese have trained each other in Mesh Potato configuration and installation.  This makes the spread of Village Telco technology potentially viral, as no expensive first-world consultants are required.

Our Internet Society 2010 grant-funded activities are now drawing to a close, but Fongtil are so pleased that they have committed their own resources to expanding the network across Dili and other Timorese districts in 2011.

Please click here for additional information about the Community Grants Programme, including pictures.

""

Chapter Update: Mexico

Contributed by: Alejandro Pisanty

The Internet Society Mexico Chapter actively participated in local Internet policy activities during February 2008.

In particular, there has been intense activity around the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, ACTA. This will soon be put forward for signature, and is considered to contain risks to the Internet.

Several members – Erik Huesca, Leon Felipe Sanchez, Carmen Rodriguez-Armenta, Emilio Saldaña, and others including the Chapter Chair, Alejandro Pisanty, took part in the open consultations called for by the Senate of the Republic, through its Plural Technical group on ACTA.

The group of Internet Society Mexico Chapter members has had a distinguished participation in these debates, conveying Internet principles and calling for open, multi-stakeholder discussion of this and other matters of Internet Governance. Some of the group’s proposals have been taken into consideration by the Senate from its first session. The consultations will continue into April 2011.

""

Chapter Update: Armenia

Contributed by Igor Mkrtumyan

1. The .AM zone was set up for DNSSEC and signed.

2. The Internet Society Armenia Chapter widely advertised “The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!” and “World IPv6 Day” programs. As a result we have witnessed a considerable increase in membership applications.

3. A Task Force for IPv6 deployment was formed including representatives of the Internet Society Armenia Chapter, the National Academy of Sciences, the Armenian NREN and the leading Armenian ISP. The Task Force drafted a letter to the prime minister proposing a plan for IPv6 deployment in Armenia.

4. The Armenian Internet Exchange (ArmIX) Board of Trustees meeting discussed the wording of the service level agreement with ArmIX stakeholders and methods for advancing the ISPs connection to the ArmIX.

3. Thirty teachers from the Dsegh village school were trained in Internet applications with the help of an Internet Society Armenia Chapter grant. Staff of the Regional Internet Community Center of Vanadzor city, an Internet Society grantee, provided the training. The trained teachers will soon start providing corresponding training to schoolchildren.

""

Chapter Update: Senegal

FRANCAIS

Le 15 Janvier 2011 s’est tenu à la Salle de Réception de Magic Land à Dakar, le premier dîner débat organisé par le chapitre du Sénégal de l’Internet Society.

Ce dîner a été l’occasion de réunir près d’une centaine de participants de différents secteurs dont des professionnels des TICs, des universitaires, des ONG et des agents de l’état.

L’objectif général de la soirée était de discuter autour d’aspects importants liés à l’Internet (défini dans le cadre du One Web Day 2010) au Sénégal :

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

Cela a permis de faire le point sur l’état de l’Internet au Sénégal et d’étudier les potentiels amélioration quand à l’utilisation et à la gouvernance de l’Internet au Sénégal.

Hormis le débat, le dîner était également l’occasion d’attribuer le prix Internet Society Sénégal décerné par l’équipe “Next Generation” à la « Personnalité » et/ou à l’« Entreprise » ayant le plus oeuvré dans la promotion et le développement de l’Internet au Sénégal durant l’année 2010.

Pour cette première édition le prix ont été décernés à :

- Monsieur Mouhamed Tidiane SECK, au titre de la personnalité;

- Et à la SONATEL SA, au titre des entreprises.

ANGLAIS

On 15 January 2011, the first dinner debate organized by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter was held in the Reception Room of Magic Land in Dakar.

The dinner was an opportunity to meet close to a hundred participants from various sectors including ICT professionals, academics, NGO and state officials.

The overall goal of the evening was to discuss about important issues related to Internet (defined at the One Web Day 2010) in Senegal:

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

This helped to review the state of the Internet in Senegal and study potential improvements in the use and governance of the Internet in Senegal.

Apart from the debate, the dinner was also the occasion to award the prize awarded by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter Team “Next Generation” to a “Personality” and a “Company” that have most worked in the promotion and development of the Internet in Senegal during 2010.

For this first edition, the prize were awarded to :

-      Mr Mouhamed Tidiane Seck, as personality;

-      And to Sonatel SA as the company.

""

Chapter Needs Survey and Smartphone Winner

Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres – le gagnant du smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, le gagnant du smartphone suite au tirage au sort après l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society, résume son expérience comme suit:

Ma participation au “Chapter Needs Survey” était très importante à trois niveaux:

1. Pour Internet Society en général car elle a permis aux gestionnaires des programmes et projets de l’Internet Society de recueillir les informations sur la perception des bénéficiaires vis a vis des actions de l’Internet Society.

2. Pour les Chapitres, c’était une occasion pour donner des orientations sur la manière dont leurs communautés Internet locales souhaiteraient être assistées par l’Internet Society.

3. En tant que gestionnaire de Chapitre, participer au sondage était aussi une occasion de me poser les questions sur la manière dont les activités de mon Chapitre sont perçues par la communauté locale et de savoir comment améliorer nos services.

Quant au smartphone, je suis ravi d’être le gagnant car il me permet d’être constamment connecté.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule est vice-président du chapitre de la République Démocratique du Congo de l’Internet Society.

Les résultats de l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society sont disponibles sur le site internet de l’Internet Society:

En français: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

En anglais: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

En espagnol: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

Internet Society Chapter Needs Survey – Winner of the smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, winner of the smartphone through the lucky prize draw following the Chapter Needs Survey, summarizes his experience as follows:

My participation in the “Chapter Needs Survey” was very important at three different levels:

1. For the Internet Society in general, since it has allowed the managers of the various Internet Society programmes and projects to collect information on the perceptions of the beneficiaries of ISOC’s actions.

2. For the Chapters, it was an occasion to provide guidance on how their local Internet communities like to be assisted by the Internet Society.

3. As a Chapter Officer, participating in the survey was also an opportunity to ask myself how the local community perceives my Chapter’s activities and how our services could be improved.

As for the Smartphone, I am delighted to be the winner because it allows me to be constantly connected.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule is vice president of the Internet Society Democratic Republic of Congo Chapter.

The results of the Internet Society’s Chapter Needs Survey are available on the Internet Society website:

English: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

French: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

Spanish: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

""

Leading Access and Hosting Providers to Join Internet Society’s IPv6 Test Flight

First global scale trial of IPv6 to take place on June 8, 2011

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND and RESTON, VIRGINIA, USA – 15 February 2011 – Comcast [Nasdaq: CMCSA], Time Warner Cable [NYSE:TWC], SoftLayer Technologies and Rackspace Hosting ( NYSE:RAX) today joined the ranks of Internet industry players committing to participate in World IPv6 Day, a global event coordinated by the Internet Society. This first global scale 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol on June 8 will enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness and prepare for seamless full deployment.

“Network operators of all sorts have been building in support for IPv6, not just websites and content hosting providers,” commented Leslie Daigle, the Internet Society’s Chief Internet Technology officer. “Networks that provide access to millions of end users complete the connection between Internet content and services and consumers of those services. Adding major access and hosting providers who are committed to World IPv6 Day is further illustration of the growing momentum around IPv6 deployment.”

A seamless transition to IPv6 is critical to enable the Internet to continue to grow to connect billions of new people and devices. This opportunity to test IPv6 readiness is a critical step in working to identify areas for improvement. One of the goals of World IPv6 Day is to expose potential issues under controlled conditions and address them as soon as possible. Scheduling the event for a 24-hour period on June 8 gives participants the opportunity to ready their systems for an industry-wide “test-flight” while working together to plan for long-term deployment of IPv6.

“World IPv6 Day is important to further the deployment and wide spread enablement of IPv6,” said John Brzozowski, Chief Architect for IPv6 and Distinguished Engineer at Comcast. “Being able to test our infrastructure at scale and verify our customers’ experience is essential to seamless enablement.”

“We’re working hard to make IPv6 available to our customers,” said Lee Howard, Director of Network Technology for Time Warner Cable.  ”All transitions have risks, and we’re glad to be working together to minimize those risks with this significant test.”

“SoftLayer is a hosting provider, but the network is an absolutely essential part of our business. Without a robust network in place, we will simply fail our customers,” said Will Charnock, Vice President, Engineering and Operations, “For that reason, SoftLayer has provided native IPv6 support to our publicly available services since December 2008. World IPv6 Day is an important one for the industry and we are pleased to participate.”

“We look forward to working with World IPv6 Day partners, industry participants and customers to help test and validate IPv6 capabilities and deployments,” said Jason Ackley, lead architect for IPv6 at Rackspace.  “Our participation in World IPv6 Day is another step in furthering the industry’s ability to work together to anticipate and solve real-world issues affecting us all while delivering sustainable long-term solutions for Internet growth. ”

The vast majority of users should be able to access services as usual, but in rare cases, mis-configured or misbehaving network equipment, particularly in home networks, may impair access to participating websites during the trial. Current estimates are that 0.05% of users may experience such problems, but participating organizations are working together with operating system manufacturers, home router vendors and ISPs to minimize the number of users affected. Participants will also be working together to provide tools to detect problems and offer suggested fixes in advance of the trial.

For more information about World IPv6 Day, how to get involved, and links to useful information for users, visit www.internetsociety.org/worldipv6day.

About the need for IPv6

IPv4 has approximately four billion IP addresses (the sequence of numbers assigned to each Internet-connected device). The explosion in the number of people, devices and web services on the Internet means that IPv4 is running out of space. IPv6, the next-generation Internet protocol, which provides over four billion times more space, will connect the billions of people not connected today and will help ensure the Internet can continue its current growth rate.

Read what the participating companies are doing to prepare for IPv6 deployment here:

Comcast’s IPv6 Information Center

IPv6 – Preparing for the new protocol

Rackspace IPv6 Roadmap Update

Softlayer and IPv6

""

Chapter Update: Germany

ISOC.DE gaining momentum

A few months ago ISOC.DE relaunched its website http://www.isoc.de/.

The old site was focused on rather static information about the Internet Society German Chapter, used plain HTML authoring and was infrequently updated.

The new page is build around a blog platform to better serve the Internet Society Germany Chapter membership and the public. Information about political, technical and Internet Society Germany Chapter events, projects and initiatives is presented and discussed. The new Internet Society Germany Chapter website presents this information regionally or globally by syndicating RSS news from IETF, the Internet Society and the local Office of W3C .

By expanding its Web presence, the  Internet Society Germany Chapter aims to gain more visibility and be more proactive in contributing to a neutral and open Internet for the benefit of the German community.

""

Chapter Update: USA San Francisco

Contributed by: Annalisa Roger, Vice-chair of the San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of the Internet Society

Dot-NXT Highlights What’s Next for the Internet

San Francisco, CA – The energy was palpable and the discussion was vibrant at the Dot-NXT Conference Feb 8 – 10, hosted by The San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of The Internet Society and managed by chapter member Kieren McCarthy with chapter member volunteers. The room was filled with Domain Name industry CEOs, entrepreneurs, investors and others all interested in participating in the biggest change of the expanding Internet that the world has yet to witness. The conference was a success as it facilitated a rich discussion between industry professionals and global stakeholders, who interacted directly with the audience of almost 200 in a lively discussion. The exchange created an understanding of many potential benefits as well as challenges for these new gTLDs. There was a focus in several sessions on how to create the best application for a new gTLD, how to optimize the launching and the importance of insuring that the true and maximum benefits to a community are realized from the TLD launch through running the domain into the future.

Dot-NXT, the first conference of its kind, was about the remarkable change that will soon cause Internet users around the world to take a new look at TLDs.  For starters, the world will begin “seeing” "" Level Domains. This is for two reasons: first, "" Level Domains are taking on a new and public face beyond their technical function. They will be recognizable markers for brands, communities, geographic locations, lifestyles, industries, causes and unlimited other interests. Second, new "" Level Domains are expected to arrive in droves on the Internet as early as 2012 and 2013.

The opening session was crowded as attendees listened to Kurt Pritz, Sr. Vice President for Stakeholder Relations of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Pritz, who leads ICANN’s implementation of the new gTLD program, describes the new TLD opportunity and application process as available to anyone interested in putting in an application to ICANN. Some think of the new TLD opportunity as a land rush of cyber real-estate with a price tag of $185,000. Experts caution it will not be easy to make it through the complex and lengthy evaluation created by the multi-stakeholder process at ICANN. Applications include proof and detail of robust technical qualifications and ability, background checks, business model evaluations, and proposed policies and governance over the name space as well as financial viability including insurance to maintain operability for 3-5 years in the form of cash reserves or a letter of credit. And the all-important component: support from the community the applicant proposes to serve.  Alternatively, affected communities may file objections to applications.

Industry experts shared their knowledge openly with specific tips and suggestions for launching new gTLDs. All the services and expertise needed by a gTLD applicant could have been hired in this one conference room. These experts, found here at this address: http://dot-nxt.com/speakers-by-session covered Marketing, Policy – application rules, how and when to apply; Implementation – working with registrars and running a registry; Back to the Future; New Extensions – new opportunity; Reality Check and more. Networking began at the cocktail party February 8, and active participants discussed and made deals with industry service providers at the small tables provided outside the session rooms throughout the next two days.

Juan Diego Calle, the ambitious and inspiring founder and CEO of .CO Internet S.A.S., the registry operator for the .CO "" Level Domain, was a highlight of the conference. He replayed the recent Superbowl ad featuring Joan Rivers for .CO and the popular “O.co” commercial, the new and hip identity for Overstock.com. Calle delivered a road map to his path of success with the .co domain, a re-delegation of Colombia’s country code TLD.  Under Juan’s leadership, .CO was launched internationally in July of 2010, and has quickly become one of the most successful domain registry launches in history, with more than 700,000 domain names registered by people and companies in 200 countries worldwide.

""

The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!

Do you have friends who, like you, are interested in joining an active global community focused on helping shape the future of the Internet?

Find out more about how you can invite your friends by logging into the Internet Society Member Portal at https://portal.isoc.org.

The Internet Society currently has more than 80 local Chapters worldwide. If you are not a member of a Chapter yet, we invite you to join one and thus support the Internet Society’s work at both local and regional levels.

A list of all Internet Society Chapters can be found at: http://www.isoc.org/isoc/chapters/list/

An active and growing membership is important to advance the Internet Society’s mission and sustain Internet Society Chapters.

""

Chapter Update: Philippines Chapter

Contributed by: Rodel Urani

The Internet Society Philippines Chapter, Advance Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) and Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) organized the 2011 Philippine IPv6 Conference and Training from 24-27 January 2011 at the Makati Shangri-la Hotel in Manila.

The four-day event was a multi-sector campaign to promote the “next generation” Internet Protocol, commonly known as IPv6. The event provided an opportunity for everyone to share information from government, business and non-government organizations, and learn about IPv6 through APNIC’s hands-on training conducted by Mr. Jeffrey Tosco. The conference was also available through live video streaming facilitated by PREGINET,  spearheaded by Mr. Bani Lara, who is also now the Internet Society Philippines Chapter Secretary.

Alongside the event we successfully elected Internet Society Philippines Chapter officers. The participation of members at this juncture was a testament to a renewed commitment to the Chapter, its Internet Society mandate and the country and its local constituents. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter with its newly elected board of trustees named Mr. Randall Lozano as President, Ms. Charity Gamboa as Vice President and Mr. Winthrop Yu as Treasurer.

The event’s keynote speaker, the Honorable Chairman Ivan John Uy of the CICT, a known cyber law expert and distinguished professorial lecturer at various universities, spoke about the importance of a multi-stakeholder approach among government businesses. Mr. Uy confirmed the signing of the rules and regulation (IRR) of the executive order (E.O.) 893, a directive stating that all government agencies’ online services to be IPv6 compliant and still interoperable with the legacy IPv4 addressing within two years. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter was one of the organizations invited to participate during the formulation of the IRR.

Another distinguished speaker was Director Denis Villorente of ASTI, who presented ASTI’s projects, including PREGINET, the country’s only national research and education network (NREN) that has links to international research and education networks, and PHOpenIX, the Philippines’ first and now one of the IPv6 enabled Internet exchanges in the country.

Our resource speakers, Ms. Miwa Fujii of APNIC, shared details of the final countdown to IPv4 exhaustion and the increasing IPv6 network activities within the Asia Pacific region. Mr. Ramon Cerezo talked about Eastern Communications’ readiness for IPv6 and Mr. Lawrence Hughes of InfoWeapons, about the “second” Internet or the use of IPv6 and the complexity involved in making an IPv6 network secure. Mr. Latif Ladid, the president of the IPv6 Forum, presented online from Luxembourg on the history behind of IPv4 depletion and his organization’s commitment to pushing IPv6 as the next generations Internet Protocol. Mr. Asif Kabani of the Internet Society Pakistan Chapter, also presented online Pakistan’s experience in IPv6 deployment.

Our final virtual speaker was Mr. Matthew Ford of the Internet Society whose presentation covered  IP

ITU decision Q&A

What is MPLS?

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) is a networking standard, created by the IETF, that assigns labels to data packets, which can then operate across multiple different protocols. Forwarding or switching decisions for MPLS packets from one network node to another are made on the basis of the label (i.e., without requiring equipment to examine the packet’s content) facilitating easy to create end-to-end circuits. MPLS is commonly used to create Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and it can be used to deliver different levels of quality of service (QoS) for different types of data. It is also gives service providers flexibility in routing; for example, to avoid broken links or failures.

What is the IETF’s role with respect to MPLS?

The IETF defined the MPLS specification, as part of the overall Internet technology specifications, which include the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6).

What is OAM?

OAM stands for Operations, Administration, and Maintenance; it is essentially the set of tools that assist an operator in managing and troubleshooting a network. This includes everything from ping and traceroute to SNMP, NetConf, and a variety of other management tools.

What has happened recently?

At a meeting that ran late into the evening on Friday 25th February 2011 in Geneva, one of the ITU’s technology focused study groups, the ITU-T Study Group 15, determined a Recommendation that defines operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. The determined Recommendation is at odds with an IETF standard, in spite of an agreement put in place by the ITU and the IETF two years ago to avoid such an outcome.

Why does this action matter?

By deciding to initiate its own non-interoperable MPLS technology development, the ITU has created a situation where, in the future there will be two groups of MPLS products that will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet.

Haven’t these international organizations worked together to develop MPLS standards and technologies?

Yes. Over the last few years, the ITU and the IETF have successfully collaborated on work in this field. Several years ago, both organizations created a joint working team (JWT) to examine the feasibility of developing a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements.

The JWT provided a report that stated not only that a single solution was possible but also confirmed that it was possible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet additional requirements.  The JWT report went on to recommend that protocol development for this enhanced MPLS, to be known as MPLS-TP, should be undertaken by the IETF. Both organisations subsequently endorsed these findings and formally accepted the JWT report in December 2008.

Regarding the MPLS OAM, the agreement based on the JWT report also stated that both organizations are able to work in this field; but with the fundamental agreement that each would deliver mutually compatible technologies.

What is likely to happen with two non-interoperable standards are developed?

If both technologies are deployed, it is likely that there will be confusion; if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Is there a commercial reason for the ITU to create a separate standard? Was the organization responding to customer demand?

The organization is driven to respond to its membership’s demands, expressed through contributions.  Certain members chose to develop this competing technology in the ITU, developing a second solution, instead of just one as recommended by the Joint Working Team (JWT).

What role does the IETF play in Internet standards development?

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the world’s premier Internet standards developer. Its mission is to make the Internet work better by producing high quality, relevant technical documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet.

Why are global standards so important?

The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. The availability of open standards means that anyone, anywhere in the world can design products, applications and technologies that enhance the Internet’s functionality.

What about multi-stakeholder collaboration in standards development?

The Internet Society believes that any interested parties, individuals or organizations should be able to contribute to standards development. In fact the IETF ensures that any interested person can participate in its work, know what is being decided, and make his or her voice heard on the issue. We believe that this collaborative approach leads to the development of an Internet that delivers the maximum value.

Did the IETF participate in the ITU-T SG15? Who made the decision?

The Internet Society is the organizational home for the IETF, and the IETF participates through the Internet Society’s ITU-T sector membership.  In that role, the IETF/Internet Society spoke against this action.  Ultimately, the decision was made by a vote. Only ITU member states (not Sector Members) were allowed to vote.

How has this sort of disconnect between the IETF and ITU been handled in the past?

This action is without precedent.

What will the IETF do?

The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification. In the ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF continues to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

Is the IETF moving too slowly on MPLS development?

The IETF has been working on the MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP), and has been making steady and consistent progress. The JWT Report was agreed in December 2008, and the first document was published as an RFC in June 2009. This progress is actually quite rapid for any standards process.

Furthermore, there is a huge amount of work being undertaken in the relevant IETF working group: http://tools.ietf.org/wg/mpls/

Why was the Interoperability Design Team disbanded?

A design team is always a short-term mechanism and once it reports back to the WG, it closes down. The MPLS-TP Interoperability Design Team was disbanded because it had finished its work, which was shifted to the MPLS Working Group to take the process further.  This is a normal practice in the IETF.  Progressing work on the MPLS standard has involved creating many other Design Teams and they have been shut down when their work was complete. It does not mean that work was in any way suspended.

Here is the official IETF description of a Design Team: from BCP 25 (RFC 2418):

6.5. Design teams

It is often useful, and perhaps inevitable, for a sub-group of a working group to develop a proposal to solve a particular problem. Such a sub-group is called a design team.  In order for a design team to remain small and agile, it is acceptable to have closed membership

and private meetings.  Design teams may range from an informal chat between people in a hallway to a formal set of expert volunteers that the WG chair or AD appoints to attack a controversial problem.  The output of a design team is always subject to approval, rejection or modification by the WG as a whole.”

In other words, what counts in the IETF process is the Working Group consensus, not the design team consensus. There are cases where the WG refuses or significantly changes the design team proposal; RFC 3246 and RFC 3248 are good examples.

What interoperability problems are we likely to see with two separate management protocols for MPLS implemented?

If there are two MPLS-TP protocols implemented, the passage of the data packets themselves around the network will remain unaffected. However, problems will arise if something goes wrong. In that case, if the MPLS routers use a different management protocol than the management systems, then the notification of the problem won’t be registered. There will also be serious problems for businesses if two systems are used – for example following a merger. These businesses will find that one management system can manage one set of routers, and the other management system the other routers, but problems on the boundary between the two systems won’t be handled properly.

""

Chapter Update: Hong Kong

Contributed by: Charles Mok

From 15th to the 25th February, the best and brightest of the Internet world gathered in Hong Kong, for what turned out to be the largest Internet community gathering in the Asia Pacific region: “APRICOT-APAN 2011” which was hosted by Internet Society Hong Kong Chapter and DotAsia Organization.

APRICOT (Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies) is the annual conference of the Asia Pacific Internet Association (APIA), and has since 1996 become the biggest event for Internet service providers, public network builders and technologists, while APAN (Asia Pacific Advanced Network) is made up of national laboratories and universities researchers.

This is the first time APRICOT-APAN was held concurrently, the event was successful beyond our expectations – with over 1,500 participants from more than 60 countries around the world, including, not only Asia Pacific but Europe, the Americas and Africa.

We were fortunate  to have Dr Vint Cerf, one of the Fathers of the Internet and Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, and Dr Ya-Qin Zhang, Microsoft Corporate Vice President and Head of Microsoft’s Asia Pacific Research Lab, to be our opening keynote speakers, and Dr H. David Lambert, CEO of Internet2, was our closing keynote speaker.

""

IETF and Internet Society Statement relating to today’s ITU-T SG15 decision that will lead to non-interoperability in MPLS development

Today, the ITU-T Study Group 15 determined a Recommendation that defines Y.1731 based operations, administration and management (OAM) for MPLS transport networks. This decision sets the stage for a divergence in MPLS development; it creates a situation where some vendors will use the IETF standard for MPLS OAM while other vendors implement the ITU-T Recommendation for OAM. This situation ensures that the two product groups will not work together. While the impact may not be immediate, ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the globally interconnected Internet, which is an interoperable network of networks.

Russ Housley, IETF chair, commented; “The Internet we know today could not have come about without open, interoperable, global standards. After we have worked so long and so hard together to ensure that MPLS OAM products from all vendors around the world would be compatible with each other, I am surprised and disappointed by the action taken by the ITU-T today, which takes us off the path of global interoperability for this technology. The decision is all the more regrettable because the IETF is just completing work on the first major phase of extensions to MPLS OAM protocols for use in transport networks.”

Furthermore, this ITU-T SG15 action represents a serious breach of the IETF/ ITU-T Joint Working Team (JWT) agreement. This JWT was commissioned by the ITU-T and IETF to examine the feasibility of a single, collaborative solution to MPLS transport requirements. The team unanimously agreed that a single viable solution had been identified;  their report was completed in April 2008 and accepted in December 2008. This JWT Report states not only that a single solution was possible but also recommended an approach where protocol development for MPLS-TP would be undertaken by the IETF. The IETF and ITU-T independently accepted and endorsed the JWT report. The ITU-T committed to the IETF that they would abide by the JWT recommendations and recognized the IETF as the design authority for MPLS. Furthermore, the JWT confirmed that it was technically feasible to extend the existing MPLS architecture to meet the requirements of a transport profile, now called MPLS-TP. Since the acceptance of the JWT Report, both organizations have worked constructively until now.

“Resolution 101 represented the clear wishes of the member states of the ITU, and was agreed at the ITU’s Plenipotentiary conference less than six months ago. That Resolution was agreed at the highest level of the Union, and yet SG15 has taken action that directly contradicts it,” said Lynn St. Amour, president and CEO of the Internet Society.

“The IETF will complete its work on a MPLS OAM specification, and the IETF leadership is considering the best way to proceed in light of this surprising development,” added Russ Housley.  “At this point, our goal is to minimize the negative consequences of this unfortunate situation. The priority is to establish a measured and careful approach that protects the stability of the Internet while enabling it to grow to serve the entire world-wide population.”

Although the ITU-T SG15 decision is disappointing, in an ongoing pursuit of a globally interoperable solution, the IETF will continue to gather transport requirements and work to extend IETF MPLS forwarding, OAM, survivability, network management, and control plane protocols to meet those requirements through the IETF Standards Process.

When two non-interoperable standards are developed, there are only two possible outcomes: if both technologies are deployed, there will be confusion, if only one is deployed, the existence of the alternative is irrelevant. In this instance, there are believed to be commercial products in development for both proposals, so confusion appears inevitable.

Russ Housley concluded, “The IETF leadership continues to believe that a single OAM solution will better serve the continued growth of Internet, and we hope that the ITU-T leadership will also come to recognize the benefits of a single globally interoperable solution.”

""

Chapter Update: Ghana

Contributed by: Ebenezer Dadzie

The Internet Society Ghana Chapter is about to launch a series of ‘Social Evenings’, to which all the Chapter members are invited. The first event in this series will take place on Friday 25 February 2011 at 6:30 PM at the Guest House of the Social Security and National Insurance Trust (SSNIT) in Accra, Ghana.
The topic for the event is “Social Networks- Benefits and Challenges” and the evening will be chaired by Nii Quaynor, Chair of the National Information Technology Agency (NITA) as well as Chair of the Board of the Internet Society Ghana Chapter.

The topics that will be discussed include social networking, security, privacy and content policy. Among the panelists will be representatives from the Ghana ISP Association, the National Communications Authority (NCA), the Internet Society Ghana Chapter and other sectors.

Find out more on the Internet Society Ghana Chapter’s website: http://www.isoc.org.gh

""

Chapter Update: Chad

Contributed by: Abdarahim Youssouf

Le projet School Net du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society a, dans le cadre de ses activités “Cyber élève”, le plaisir d’informer les élèves et étudiants qui désirent devenir membre de son club Internet de se manifester pour bénéficier des avantages suivants :

  • Le statut “Cyber élève” donne droit à une réduction du prix de connexion internet tous les jours
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent bénéficier d’une assistance pour leurs recherches de cours, d’exposés, de documentation, de mémoire etc.
  • Les “Cyber élèves” peuvent assister aux débats sur Internet, qui ont lieu chaque semaine.
  • Et, ils/elles peuvent aussi bénéficier d’une assistance pour se perfectionner dans le domaine de l’usage de Facebook, Yahoo, Hotmail, Tagget, etc.

Le Club Internet du chapitre du Chad de l’Internet Society est aussi un lieu d’échanges entre les internautes avancés et les débutants.

""

Chapter Update: Australia

Contributed by: Holly Raiche

Tony Hill, President of the Australia Chapter and chair of the Asia Pacific IPv6 Task Force, attended the IPv6 Transition Conference at the joint meeting of APRICOT 2011, APAN and APNIC31 in Hong Kong on 22 February.  The meeting was assembled by a joint program committee and attracted interest from many organisations with major contributions from the Internet Society and APNIC.  Speakers were also present from Facebook, Google and Akamai who explained their current experience with IPv6 and plans for the Internet Society organised World IPv6-day to be held for 24 hours on 8 June 2011.

Vice President Narelle Clark continues participation in the review of the national consumer protection code on telecommunications (including Internet users).

We are also organising a joint seminar with the IEEE for March, with Narelle as speaker, titled “The Internet’s Off Switch: Wikileaks, Arab Protests and Beyond’.

""

Chapter Update: Belgium

Contributed by: Rudi Vansnick

Internet Society Belgium Chapter joins European commission SSEDIC project

Earlier this month the final agreement between the European Commission and the consortium presenting the proposal has been signed. The SSEDIC project is now a reality.

Over the course of the next three years, 35 partners will work closely together, forming groups to discuss s the political, economic, social, technical, legal and environmental aspects of a single European digital community.

The 35 partner stakeholders and the initial additional associated partners we introduce here (who have strongly expressed interest in participating) are only the start of this stakeholder network. The aim of this network is to build a community of high level European and international experts over the next three years. This community will be built via virtual tools: a dedicated online workspace, online conferences as well as via real live events integrated in the EEMA conference agenda and other major European Commission events.

During this process, the Internet Society Belgium Chapter will focus on the consumer and of course will call on each of the Internet Society Chapters in Europe to participate.

More details about this project can be found on http://www.eid-ssedic.eu/

Internet Society Belgium Chapter is participating in international events

On Tuesday 15/2 the Internet Society Belgium Chapter chair spoke in Albania during the Child protection conference. During the event,  meetings were scheduled to discuss the establishment of an Albanian chapter. The process of creating the basics of the chapter is now ongoing.

Internet Society Belgium Chapter organises WSA Belgium 2011

We are in the process of selecting the 8 best e-Content projects for Belgium – an activity we have undertaken previously in 2005, 2007 and 2009. Those chosen will be nominated for the world contest.

""

Don’t take the Internet for granted, Internet Society warns at INET conference

Global organisation urges Internet users to act to keep the Internet open and transparent

23 Frankfurt 2011, FRANKFURT – The Internet Society warned today that taking the Internet for granted would be one of the surest ways to ruin it.

At its INET conference in Frankfurt on the threats, challenges and opportunities facing the Internet, the Internet Society cautioned users that they would take it for granted at their peril.

“The future success of the Internet is heavily dependent on its openness, access and transparency,” said  Frederic Donck, director of the Internet Society’s European Regional Bureau. “Remove any of these core attributes, and the Internet will be become virtually useless as a platform for communication and innovation.”

The Internet Society called on all users to take urgent steps to ensure that the future development of the Internet takes a course that is in the best interests of everyone.

“We cannot afford not to engage now as big decisions are being made on the future of the Internet that will have a direct impact on our business and social lives. Complacency over such vital issues as net neutrality, security, privacy and data protection is simply not an option,” Mr Donck said.

To this end, the Internet Society is launching the first global 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol, to take off on June 8, to enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness as the pool of existing IPv4 addresses dries up. Already, leading Internet industry names Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco, among others, have committed to join the trial.

At today’s conference, to Illustrate the potential for a future Internet very different than the one used today, the Internet Society will screen videos of four scenarios that highlight contrasting paths along which it could develop.

Of the four scenarios, the Internet Society advocates The Common Pool, in which the Internet continues to be built on open technologies and processes, fostering permission-less innovation, economic growth, and social development.

Mr Donck acknowledged the concerns of many citizens in Germany and elsewhere about privacy and data protection, but he emphasised the importance of safeguarding the unique qualities of the Internet in the face of any public pressure for tougher measures.

“Knee-jerk reactions over privacy and data protection – or any other Internet-related issue, for that matter – would simply be counter-productive, putting at risk the very qualities that make the Internet an indispensable successful social and business tool worldwide,” he said.

A speaker at today’s conference, Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, said: “The need for effective data protection is now greater than ever before, in a world where concerns about privacy are increasing, as citizens discover how new technologies are impacting on their lives.”

A panel debate on network confidence and privacy will feature Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft’s senior regulatory policy manager for EMEA and Ramses Martinez, Verisign’s information security director.

Rick Falkvinge, founder of the Swedish Pirate Party, also a speaker at the INET, said: “The key challenges for the Internet today are no longer technical, but political. The technology is causing a power shift as large as the printing press did, and a lot of powerful people would rather cripple
the net than let their power shift to the masses.

James M. Galvin, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards at Afilias, sponsor of the INET, said: “Along with common goals of openness, access and transparency, the future of the Internet depends on the ongoing adoption of common technical standards like IPv6 and DNSSEC. Afilias is proud to have helped lead the way in implementing these standards, and looks forward to sharing our technical knowledge as part of the Internet Society.”

For the announcement in German visit here.

""

„Das Internet ist nicht selbstverständlich“, warnt die Internet Society auf der INET Konferenz

Die globale Organisation drängt Internetnutzer zu handeln, um ein offenes und transparentes Internet zu erhalten

23. Februar 2011, FRANKFURT am Main – Die Internet Society warnte heute, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu sehen, wäre einer der sichersten Wege, es zu ruinieren.

Auf der INET Konfernez zu den Gefahren, Herausforderungen und Chancen des Internet, mahnte die Internet Society Internetnutzer zur Vorsicht, das Internet als selbstverständlich zu nehmen.

“Die Zukunftsfähigkeit des Internet hängt stark von seiner Offenheit, Zugänglichkeit und Transparenz ab“, sagte Frederic Donck, Leiter des Europa-Büros der Internet Society. „Nehmen wir nur eine dieser Schlüsseleigenschaften weg, und das Internet wird als Kommunikations- und Innovationsplattform praktisch nutzlos.“

Die Internet Society rief alle Nutzer zu dringenden Schritten auf, um sicherzustellen, dass die Entwicklung des Internet eine Richtung nimmt, die im besten Interesse von allen ist.

„Wir können es uns nicht leisten, nicht zu reagieren, gerade jetzt, da wichtige Entscheidungen zur Zukunft des Internet getroffen werden, die einen direkten Einfluss auf unser Business und soziales Leben haben werden. Zufriedenheit mit so wichtigen Themen wie Netzneutralität, Sicherheit, Datenschutz und –sichereit ist einfach keine Option“, sagte Donck.

Dazu launched die Internet Society den ersten weltweiten 24-Stunden „Testflug“ der nächsten Gernation des Internet Protokoll. Der soll am 8. Juni starten, um der Industrie die Möglichkeit zu geben, die IPv6-Bereitschaft zu testen, da sich der Pool der bestehenden IPv4-Adressen dem Ende zuneigt. Führende Internet-Unternehmen wie Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing and Cisco haben bereits zugesagt, an dem Versuch teilzunehmen.

Bei der heutigen Konferenz illustriert die Internet Society die Möglichkeit eines zukünftigen Internet, das sich sehr von dem heutigen unterscheiden wird. Mit Szenario-Videos zeigt die Internet Society auf der Konferenz vier unterschiedliche Wege, wie sich das Internet entwickeln könnte.

Von diesen vier Szenarien befürwortet die Internet Society „The Common Pool“. Dabei setzt das Internet auch in Zukunft offene Technologien und Prozesse voraus und unterstützt so unkomplizierte Innovation, wirtschaftliches Wachstum und soziale Entwicklungen.

Frederic Donck sieht die Bedenken über Datenschutz und –sicherheit vieler Bürger in Deutschland und anderswo, aber er betont, dass es wichtig ist, die einzigartigen Qualitäten des Internet gegenüber dem öffentlichen Druck für strengere Maßnahmen zu schützen.

“Reflexreaktionen zu Datenschutz und -sicherheit – sowie zu jedem anderen Internetbezogenen Problem, auf das es ankommt – wären einfach kontraproduktiv, da wir so die einzigartigen Qualitäten aufs Spiel setzen, die das Internet zu einem unverzichtbaren, erfolgreichen sozialem und geschäftlichem Instrument weltweit machen“, sagte er.

Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, und Sprecher auf der heutigen Konferenz sagt: „Die Notwendigkeit eines effektiven Datenschutzes ist jetzt größer als jemals zuvor, in einer Welt, in der Sorge über Datenschutz wächst, da Bürger entdecken, wie neue Technologien Einfluss auf ihr Leben nehmen.“

An der Diskussionsrund über Netzwerksicherheit und Datenschutz nehmen Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft Senior Regulatory Policy Manager und Ramses Martinez, Verisign Information Security Director, teil.

Rick Falkvinge, Gründer der Schwedischen Piratenpartei, ist ebenfalls Sprecher bei der INET-Konferenz und sagt: „Die wichtigsten Herausforderungen für das Internet sind heute nicht mehr technisch, sondern politisch. Die Technolgie verursacht eine Machtverschiebung, so groß wie damals die Druckpresse, und viele mächtige Leute würden lieber das Netz stark beschädigen als zuzulassen, dass sich ihre Macht zu den Massen verschiebt.“

James M. Galve, Director of Strategic Relationships and Technical Standards bei Afilias und Sponsor der INET, sagt: „Die Zukunft des Internet hängt neben den gemeinsamen Zielen Offenheit, Zugang und Transparenz von der permanenten Anpassung an technische Standards wie IPv6 und DNSSEC ab. Afilias ist stolz geholfen zu haben, den Weg für die Einführung dieser Standards zu bereiten und wir freuen uns darauf, unsere technischen Fachkenntnisse als Teil der Internet Society zu teilen.“

""

Chapter Update: India Kolkata

Contributed by: Niel Hirjee

A two day Hands-On IPv6 Workshop was organized by the Internet Society India Kolkata Chapter in association with APNIC (Asia Pacific Network Information Centre) and co-sponsored by NIXI (National Internet Exchange of India).

The workshop was held on January 31 and February 1, 2011 at the Hotel Indismart at Salt Lake Electronics Complex, the heart of the IT industry of Kolkata. Thirty five people from Kolkata and the neighboring cities of Siliguri, Gauhati, Bokaro and even a few from New Delhi, representing diverse organizations such as Airtel, Indian Cablenet, WEBEL, Net4India, Ortel Communication, Rail Tel, STPI, TCS and Wipro, amongst others, attended the workshop.

Four ISOC India Kolkata Chapter members namely, Anand Raje, Anupam Agarwal, Niel Hirjee and Ritwick Majumder also received training under the train the trainer model to enable them carry out more workshops on IPv6 to build capacity in the region.

Champika Wijayatunga and Vivek Nigam of APNIC conducted the workshop and included a live and hands-on session on router configuration for IPv6, which was much appreciated by all.

This was the second IPv6 workshop organized by the Chapter. It was fully booked a week before the event and had 100% attendance.

""

Community Grants Programme Project Showcase: Dili Village Telco

Contributed by: David Rowe, Global Member (May 2010 grantee)

The Dili Village Telco project is building a 100 node mesh telephony network in Dili, Timor Leste.  Since the project started 12 months ago, we have installed 60 nodes in Dili, and 10 each in the regional towns of Baucau and Ermera.  This network is in daily use, providing free telephone calls between NGOs.

Like many developing countries, GSM phone calls are very expensive in Timor.  In some areas there is no telephone network.  Even a call to an office a few 100m way costs the equivalent of a few hours wages for a local person.  So every free phone call our network delivers is like a valuable gift – removing the current “tax” on telecommunications.  This frees up valuable NGO funds for other important operations, and creates tighter links between organisations.

The end user response to the Dili Village Telco has been amazing.  The staff of NGOs want them at home, and Fongtil (our Timorese partner organisation in the project) receives continual requests for new nodes.  The Mesh Potato Hardware (a Wifi router with a telephone port) has proven rugged and reliable in the tropical environment of Timor.

We have also had excellent results in technology transfer and training. Local Timorese have trained each other in Mesh Potato configuration and installation.  This makes the spread of Village Telco technology potentially viral, as no expensive first-world consultants are required.

Our Internet Society 2010 grant-funded activities are now drawing to a close, but Fongtil are so pleased that they have committed their own resources to expanding the network across Dili and other Timorese districts in 2011.

Please click here for additional information about the Community Grants Programme, including pictures.

""

Chapter Update: Mexico

Contributed by: Alejandro Pisanty

The Internet Society Mexico Chapter actively participated in local Internet policy activities during February 2008.

In particular, there has been intense activity around the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, ACTA. This will soon be put forward for signature, and is considered to contain risks to the Internet.

Several members – Erik Huesca, Leon Felipe Sanchez, Carmen Rodriguez-Armenta, Emilio Saldaña, and others including the Chapter Chair, Alejandro Pisanty, took part in the open consultations called for by the Senate of the Republic, through its Plural Technical group on ACTA.

The group of Internet Society Mexico Chapter members has had a distinguished participation in these debates, conveying Internet principles and calling for open, multi-stakeholder discussion of this and other matters of Internet Governance. Some of the group’s proposals have been taken into consideration by the Senate from its first session. The consultations will continue into April 2011.

""

Chapter Update: Armenia

Contributed by Igor Mkrtumyan

1. The .AM zone was set up for DNSSEC and signed.

2. The Internet Society Armenia Chapter widely advertised “The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!” and “World IPv6 Day” programs. As a result we have witnessed a considerable increase in membership applications.

3. A Task Force for IPv6 deployment was formed including representatives of the Internet Society Armenia Chapter, the National Academy of Sciences, the Armenian NREN and the leading Armenian ISP. The Task Force drafted a letter to the prime minister proposing a plan for IPv6 deployment in Armenia.

4. The Armenian Internet Exchange (ArmIX) Board of Trustees meeting discussed the wording of the service level agreement with ArmIX stakeholders and methods for advancing the ISPs connection to the ArmIX.

3. Thirty teachers from the Dsegh village school were trained in Internet applications with the help of an Internet Society Armenia Chapter grant. Staff of the Regional Internet Community Center of Vanadzor city, an Internet Society grantee, provided the training. The trained teachers will soon start providing corresponding training to schoolchildren.

""

Chapter Update: Senegal

FRANCAIS

Le 15 Janvier 2011 s’est tenu à la Salle de Réception de Magic Land à Dakar, le premier dîner débat organisé par le chapitre du Sénégal de l’Internet Society.

Ce dîner a été l’occasion de réunir près d’une centaine de participants de différents secteurs dont des professionnels des TICs, des universitaires, des ONG et des agents de l’état.

L’objectif général de la soirée était de discuter autour d’aspects importants liés à l’Internet (défini dans le cadre du One Web Day 2010) au Sénégal :

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

Cela a permis de faire le point sur l’état de l’Internet au Sénégal et d’étudier les potentiels amélioration quand à l’utilisation et à la gouvernance de l’Internet au Sénégal.

Hormis le débat, le dîner était également l’occasion d’attribuer le prix Internet Society Sénégal décerné par l’équipe “Next Generation” à la « Personnalité » et/ou à l’« Entreprise » ayant le plus oeuvré dans la promotion et le développement de l’Internet au Sénégal durant l’année 2010.

Pour cette première édition le prix ont été décernés à :

- Monsieur Mouhamed Tidiane SECK, au titre de la personnalité;

- Et à la SONATEL SA, au titre des entreprises.

ANGLAIS

On 15 January 2011, the first dinner debate organized by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter was held in the Reception Room of Magic Land in Dakar.

The dinner was an opportunity to meet close to a hundred participants from various sectors including ICT professionals, academics, NGO and state officials.

The overall goal of the evening was to discuss about important issues related to Internet (defined at the One Web Day 2010) in Senegal:

·      “The End-to-End principe”

·      “Open Internetworking”

·      “The Internet model”

This helped to review the state of the Internet in Senegal and study potential improvements in the use and governance of the Internet in Senegal.

Apart from the debate, the dinner was also the occasion to award the prize awarded by the Internet Society Senegal Chapter Team “Next Generation” to a “Personality” and a “Company” that have most worked in the promotion and development of the Internet in Senegal during 2010.

For this first edition, the prize were awarded to :

-      Mr Mouhamed Tidiane Seck, as personality;

-      And to Sonatel SA as the company.

""

Chapter Needs Survey and Smartphone Winner

Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres – le gagnant du smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, le gagnant du smartphone suite au tirage au sort après l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society, résume son expérience comme suit:

Ma participation au “Chapter Needs Survey” était très importante à trois niveaux:

1. Pour Internet Society en général car elle a permis aux gestionnaires des programmes et projets de l’Internet Society de recueillir les informations sur la perception des bénéficiaires vis a vis des actions de l’Internet Society.

2. Pour les Chapitres, c’était une occasion pour donner des orientations sur la manière dont leurs communautés Internet locales souhaiteraient être assistées par l’Internet Society.

3. En tant que gestionnaire de Chapitre, participer au sondage était aussi une occasion de me poser les questions sur la manière dont les activités de mon Chapitre sont perçues par la communauté locale et de savoir comment améliorer nos services.

Quant au smartphone, je suis ravi d’être le gagnant car il me permet d’être constamment connecté.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule est vice-président du chapitre de la République Démocratique du Congo de l’Internet Society.

Les résultats de l’Enquête sur les besoins des chapitres de l’Internet Society sont disponibles sur le site internet de l’Internet Society:

En français: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

En anglais: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

En espagnol: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

Internet Society Chapter Needs Survey – Winner of the smartphone

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule, winner of the smartphone through the lucky prize draw following the Chapter Needs Survey, summarizes his experience as follows:

My participation in the “Chapter Needs Survey” was very important at three different levels:

1. For the Internet Society in general, since it has allowed the managers of the various Internet Society programmes and projects to collect information on the perceptions of the beneficiaries of ISOC’s actions.

2. For the Chapters, it was an occasion to provide guidance on how their local Internet communities like to be assisted by the Internet Society.

3. As a Chapter Officer, participating in the survey was also an opportunity to ask myself how the local community perceives my Chapter’s activities and how our services could be improved.

As for the Smartphone, I am delighted to be the winner because it allows me to be constantly connected.

Frédéric Mutembo M’Fabule is vice president of the Internet Society Democratic Republic of Congo Chapter.

The results of the Internet Society’s Chapter Needs Survey are available on the Internet Society website:

English: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-en.pdf

French: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-fr.pdf

Spanish: http://www.isoc.org/members/surveys/SurveyResults/24/chapter-survey-2010-es.pdf

""

Leading Access and Hosting Providers to Join Internet Society’s IPv6 Test Flight

First global scale trial of IPv6 to take place on June 8, 2011

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND and RESTON, VIRGINIA, USA – 15 February 2011 – Comcast [Nasdaq: CMCSA], Time Warner Cable [NYSE:TWC], SoftLayer Technologies and Rackspace Hosting ( NYSE:RAX) today joined the ranks of Internet industry players committing to participate in World IPv6 Day, a global event coordinated by the Internet Society. This first global scale 24-hour “test flight” of the next generation Internet Protocol on June 8 will enable the industry to test IPv6 readiness and prepare for seamless full deployment.

“Network operators of all sorts have been building in support for IPv6, not just websites and content hosting providers,” commented Leslie Daigle, the Internet Society’s Chief Internet Technology officer. “Networks that provide access to millions of end users complete the connection between Internet content and services and consumers of those services. Adding major access and hosting providers who are committed to World IPv6 Day is further illustration of the growing momentum around IPv6 deployment.”

A seamless transition to IPv6 is critical to enable the Internet to continue to grow to connect billions of new people and devices. This opportunity to test IPv6 readiness is a critical step in working to identify areas for improvement. One of the goals of World IPv6 Day is to expose potential issues under controlled conditions and address them as soon as possible. Scheduling the event for a 24-hour period on June 8 gives participants the opportunity to ready their systems for an industry-wide “test-flight” while working together to plan for long-term deployment of IPv6.

“World IPv6 Day is important to further the deployment and wide spread enablement of IPv6,” said John Brzozowski, Chief Architect for IPv6 and Distinguished Engineer at Comcast. “Being able to test our infrastructure at scale and verify our customers’ experience is essential to seamless enablement.”

“We’re working hard to make IPv6 available to our customers,” said Lee Howard, Director of Network Technology for Time Warner Cable.  ”All transitions have risks, and we’re glad to be working together to minimize those risks with this significant test.”

“SoftLayer is a hosting provider, but the network is an absolutely essential part of our business. Without a robust network in place, we will simply fail our customers,” said Will Charnock, Vice President, Engineering and Operations, “For that reason, SoftLayer has provided native IPv6 support to our publicly available services since December 2008. World IPv6 Day is an important one for the industry and we are pleased to participate.”

“We look forward to working with World IPv6 Day partners, industry participants and customers to help test and validate IPv6 capabilities and deployments,” said Jason Ackley, lead architect for IPv6 at Rackspace.  “Our participation in World IPv6 Day is another step in furthering the industry’s ability to work together to anticipate and solve real-world issues affecting us all while delivering sustainable long-term solutions for Internet growth. ”

The vast majority of users should be able to access services as usual, but in rare cases, mis-configured or misbehaving network equipment, particularly in home networks, may impair access to participating websites during the trial. Current estimates are that 0.05% of users may experience such problems, but participating organizations are working together with operating system manufacturers, home router vendors and ISPs to minimize the number of users affected. Participants will also be working together to provide tools to detect problems and offer suggested fixes in advance of the trial.

For more information about World IPv6 Day, how to get involved, and links to useful information for users, visit www.internetsociety.org/worldipv6day.

About the need for IPv6

IPv4 has approximately four billion IP addresses (the sequence of numbers assigned to each Internet-connected device). The explosion in the number of people, devices and web services on the Internet means that IPv4 is running out of space. IPv6, the next-generation Internet protocol, which provides over four billion times more space, will connect the billions of people not connected today and will help ensure the Internet can continue its current growth rate.

Read what the participating companies are doing to prepare for IPv6 deployment here:

Comcast’s IPv6 Information Center

IPv6 – Preparing for the new protocol

Rackspace IPv6 Roadmap Update

Softlayer and IPv6

""

Chapter Update: Germany

ISOC.DE gaining momentum

A few months ago ISOC.DE relaunched its website http://www.isoc.de/.

The old site was focused on rather static information about the Internet Society German Chapter, used plain HTML authoring and was infrequently updated.

The new page is build around a blog platform to better serve the Internet Society Germany Chapter membership and the public. Information about political, technical and Internet Society Germany Chapter events, projects and initiatives is presented and discussed. The new Internet Society Germany Chapter website presents this information regionally or globally by syndicating RSS news from IETF, the Internet Society and the local Office of W3C .

By expanding its Web presence, the  Internet Society Germany Chapter aims to gain more visibility and be more proactive in contributing to a neutral and open Internet for the benefit of the German community.

""

Chapter Update: USA San Francisco

Contributed by: Annalisa Roger, Vice-chair of the San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of the Internet Society

Dot-NXT Highlights What’s Next for the Internet

San Francisco, CA – The energy was palpable and the discussion was vibrant at the Dot-NXT Conference Feb 8 – 10, hosted by The San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of The Internet Society and managed by chapter member Kieren McCarthy with chapter member volunteers. The room was filled with Domain Name industry CEOs, entrepreneurs, investors and others all interested in participating in the biggest change of the expanding Internet that the world has yet to witness. The conference was a success as it facilitated a rich discussion between industry professionals and global stakeholders, who interacted directly with the audience of almost 200 in a lively discussion. The exchange created an understanding of many potential benefits as well as challenges for these new gTLDs. There was a focus in several sessions on how to create the best application for a new gTLD, how to optimize the launching and the importance of insuring that the true and maximum benefits to a community are realized from the TLD launch through running the domain into the future.

Dot-NXT, the first conference of its kind, was about the remarkable change that will soon cause Internet users around the world to take a new look at TLDs.  For starters, the world will begin “seeing” "" Level Domains. This is for two reasons: first, "" Level Domains are taking on a new and public face beyond their technical function. They will be recognizable markers for brands, communities, geographic locations, lifestyles, industries, causes and unlimited other interests. Second, new "" Level Domains are expected to arrive in droves on the Internet as early as 2012 and 2013.

The opening session was crowded as attendees listened to Kurt Pritz, Sr. Vice President for Stakeholder Relations of the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Pritz, who leads ICANN’s implementation of the new gTLD program, describes the new TLD opportunity and application process as available to anyone interested in putting in an application to ICANN. Some think of the new TLD opportunity as a land rush of cyber real-estate with a price tag of $185,000. Experts caution it will not be easy to make it through the complex and lengthy evaluation created by the multi-stakeholder process at ICANN. Applications include proof and detail of robust technical qualifications and ability, background checks, business model evaluations, and proposed policies and governance over the name space as well as financial viability including insurance to maintain operability for 3-5 years in the form of cash reserves or a letter of credit. And the all-important component: support from the community the applicant proposes to serve.  Alternatively, affected communities may file objections to applications.

Industry experts shared their knowledge openly with specific tips and suggestions for launching new gTLDs. All the services and expertise needed by a gTLD applicant could have been hired in this one conference room. These experts, found here at this address: http://dot-nxt.com/speakers-by-session covered Marketing, Policy – application rules, how and when to apply; Implementation – working with registrars and running a registry; Back to the Future; New Extensions – new opportunity; Reality Check and more. Networking began at the cocktail party February 8, and active participants discussed and made deals with industry service providers at the small tables provided outside the session rooms throughout the next two days.

Juan Diego Calle, the ambitious and inspiring founder and CEO of .CO Internet S.A.S., the registry operator for the .CO "" Level Domain, was a highlight of the conference. He replayed the recent Superbowl ad featuring Joan Rivers for .CO and the popular “O.co” commercial, the new and hip identity for Overstock.com. Calle delivered a road map to his path of success with the .co domain, a re-delegation of Colombia’s country code TLD.  Under Juan’s leadership, .CO was launched internationally in July of 2010, and has quickly become one of the most successful domain registry launches in history, with more than 700,000 domain names registered by people and companies in 200 countries worldwide.

""

The Internet is for everyone – Bring a Friend!

Do you have friends who, like you, are interested in joining an active global community focused on helping shape the future of the Internet?

Find out more about how you can invite your friends by logging into the Internet Society Member Portal at https://portal.isoc.org.

The Internet Society currently has more than 80 local Chapters worldwide. If you are not a member of a Chapter yet, we invite you to join one and thus support the Internet Society’s work at both local and regional levels.

A list of all Internet Society Chapters can be found at: http://www.isoc.org/isoc/chapters/list/

An active and growing membership is important to advance the Internet Society’s mission and sustain Internet Society Chapters.

""

Chapter Update: Philippines Chapter

Contributed by: Rodel Urani

The Internet Society Philippines Chapter, Advance Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) and Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) organized the 2011 Philippine IPv6 Conference and Training from 24-27 January 2011 at the Makati Shangri-la Hotel in Manila.

The four-day event was a multi-sector campaign to promote the “next generation” Internet Protocol, commonly known as IPv6. The event provided an opportunity for everyone to share information from government, business and non-government organizations, and learn about IPv6 through APNIC’s hands-on training conducted by Mr. Jeffrey Tosco. The conference was also available through live video streaming facilitated by PREGINET,  spearheaded by Mr. Bani Lara, who is also now the Internet Society Philippines Chapter Secretary.

Alongside the event we successfully elected Internet Society Philippines Chapter officers. The participation of members at this juncture was a testament to a renewed commitment to the Chapter, its Internet Society mandate and the country and its local constituents. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter with its newly elected board of trustees named Mr. Randall Lozano as President, Ms. Charity Gamboa as Vice President and Mr. Winthrop Yu as Treasurer.

The event’s keynote speaker, the Honorable Chairman Ivan John Uy of the CICT, a known cyber law expert and distinguished professorial lecturer at various universities, spoke about the importance of a multi-stakeholder approach among government businesses. Mr. Uy confirmed the signing of the rules and regulation (IRR) of the executive order (E.O.) 893, a directive stating that all government agencies’ online services to be IPv6 compliant and still interoperable with the legacy IPv4 addressing within two years. The Internet Society Philippines Chapter was one of the organizations invited to participate during the formulation of the IRR.

Another distinguished speaker was Director Denis Villorente of ASTI, who presented ASTI’s projects, including PREGINET, the country’s only national research and education network (NREN) that has links to international research and education networks, and PHOpenIX, the Philippines’ first and now one of the IPv6 enabled Internet exchanges in the country.

Our resource speakers, Ms. Miwa Fujii of APNIC, shared details of the final countdown to IPv4 exhaustion and the increasing IPv6 network activities within the Asia Pacific region. Mr. Ramon Cerezo talked about Eastern Communications’ readiness for IPv6 and Mr. Lawrence Hughes of InfoWeapons, about the “second” Internet or the use of IPv6 and the complexity involved in making an IPv6 network secure. Mr. Latif Ladid, the president of the IPv6 Forum, presented online from Luxembourg on the history behind of IPv4 depletion and his organization’s commitment to pushing IPv6 as the next generations Internet Protocol. Mr. Asif Kabani of the Internet Society Pakistan Chapter, also presented online Pakistan’s experience in IPv6 deployment.

Our final virtual speaker was Mr. Matthew Ford of the Internet Society whose presentation covered  IPv6 global deployment, momentum and milestones. Mr. Ford maintained that IPv6 is the only answer for a globally-connected Internet and recommended that organizations make IPv6 transition a priority. He also urged them to accelerate deployment and communicate plans and status, especially to the public.

""

ISOC Member Newsletter. Suggestions, comments, and questions welcome to, newsletter@isoc.org

ISOC's key initiatives target the critical issues that affect all aspects of Internet development and growth. They embody ISOC's philosophy that the Internet is for everyone and they provide the organization with a solid foundation from which to positively influence standards development, access, business practices, and government policies.

v6 global deployment, momentum and milestones. Mr. Ford maintained that IPv6 is the only answer for a globally-connected Internet and recommended that organizations make IPv6 transition a priority. He also urged them to accelerate deployment and communicate plans and status, especially to the public.

""

ISOC Member Newsletter. Suggestions, comments, and questions welcome to, newsletter@isoc.org

ISOC's key initiatives target the critical issues that affect all aspects of Internet development and growth. They embody ISOC's philosophy that the Internet is for everyone and they provide the organization with a solid foundation from which to positively influence standards development, access, business practices, and government policies.

Comments (0)
Only registered users can write comments!
Internet Society of Puerto Rico thanks Compojoom for providing this component